Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'big man'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Miami HEAT Message Boards
    • Team Talk
    • League Talk
    • General Discussion
  • Miami HEAT News and Articles
    • HEAT News
    • HOT Links
  • Forum in General
    • Administrative
    • Thread Hall of Fame

Categories

  • News

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Blogs

  • Courtside with WB.
  • AJ's Blog
  • Check This Out says ThunderDAN
  • DP's White Hot Write Up
  • The Hot Seat
  • herve.joseph1's Blog
  • Boshynator
  • efren7m's Blog
  • Ursweetheatfan's Blog
  • Efesaygın's Blog
  • 82-0/Miami Heat
  • corydemarcus65's Blog
  • jahmeek's Blog
  • MIAMIONFIRE's Blog
  • blackbone's Blog
  • SIGN DRE BALDWIN
  • anthonymoceo's Blog
  • EdCurryRules' Blog
  • HeatLeBronFan's Blog
  • The PULSE Blog
  • Juzzmiami's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • pow124's Blog
  • Markeyz1's Blog
  • jake03's Blog
  • the year of the heat
  • alexx's Blog
  • Big Ken's Blog
  • trevinotime's Blog
  • chewy239's Blog
  • LaughingLeoperd's Blog
  • DWarner4's Blog
  • Rechine's Blog
  • RUDY_#1DWADE_FAN's Blog
  • Heat at Celtics game
  • solomon's Blog
  • irish dwight's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • OverRatedSuperStar's Blog
  • OverRatedSuperStar's Blog
  • Offensivemastermind's Blog
  • jaybeast45's Blog
  • jaybeast45's Blog
  • adpsnoop's Blog
  • Mrs Wiz's Blog
  • gailenna's Blog
  • mrterrylove27's Blog
  • 2011-2012 Playoffs Blog
  • LUCKY 7's Blog
  • starjack01's Blog
  • starjack01's Blog
  • Jin's Blog
  • kckc4733's Blog
  • kckc4733's Blog
  • Miami Heats James Jones Youth Basketball Shooting Camp
  • flareblitz2001's Blog
  • Roosevelt Clark's Blog
  • daniellecheech's Blog
  • daniellecheech's Blog
  • MichaelRedd's Blog
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • jessie0402's Blog
  • Dele Cares' Blog
  • osttar's Blog
  • normalchick's Blog
  • normalchick's Blog
  • Heat Nation 707's Blog
  • Coach Potato's Blog
  • Eloii-Zsa's Blog
  • Eloii-Zsa's Blog
  • didierlebron007's Blog
  • jbjones' Blog
  • Simaq7's Blog
  • HENNESSYBLACK1's Blog
  • Ebel's Blog
  • DJ Matt's Blog
  • TideHeatFan4Life's Blog
  • Back to Miami for Games 3, 4 and 5
  • enitx's Blog
  • CJayMiami's Blog
  • uonib
  • binou's Blog
  • Draft Result
  • jaramillo10's blog
  • Cia's Blog
  • #Miami_Heat's Blog
  • bossturner's Blog
  • boca_fan's Blog
  • boca_fan's Blog
  • ardsman36's Blog
  • itzflyboi2007's Blog
  • okxs5's Blog
  • okxs5's Blog
  • zzz8975's Blog
  • bpu321's Blog
  • Scar's Blog
  • KingsReign2407's Blog
  • miami heat fan#1's Blog
  • DON HALL's Blog
  • MIAMI HEAT
  • Did Eddy Curry get cut?
  • Bush33's nba Blog
  • cuty_boi69's Blog
  • cuty_boi69's Blog
  • xygy01's Blog
  • xygy01's Blog
  • big-b1's Blog
  • john110's Blog
  • Bramm Miami Heat
  • huwuf5's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • LeBron James 1's Blog
  • LeBron James 1's Blog
  • xanthe18's Blog
  • Hollywood As Hell
  • Brittina Cash Out's Blog
  • britgirl12's Blog
  • Katima's Blog
  • tere's Blog
  • rbyrne7's Blog
  • wety's Blog
  • Lil Durant's Blog
  • ayy_vonte's Blog
  • fangsiqi's Blog
  • yjxnews2010's Blog
  • Xcitement's Blog
  • Miami HEAT UK
  • HJV3O5's Blog
  • miami mike
  • Jshelton31's Blog
  • MiamiHeatRadio's Blog
  • MiamiHeatRadio's Blog
  • bookchen13's Blog
  • iSportsLife
  • Australian Miami Heat fans
  • YLT-MAC's Blog
  • DerekWiner's Blog
  • JoshKou's Blog
  • camisetas nba información
  • Thank you for the Memories
  • PATJ's Blog
  • city03's Blog
  • mp54254's Blog
  • mp54254's Blog
  • MsTasha's Blog
  • MsTasha's Blog
  • PATJ's Blog
  • www.MiamiHeatFlorida.wordpress.com's Blog
  • Miami Heat Offical Blog
  • 19heat's Blog
  • blueredgraydonval
  • Loriann's Blog
  • rjthea2210's Blog
  • otzgame's Blog
  • MariahFloria's Blog
  • riyad's Blog
  • riyad's Blog
  • koluma's Blog
  • zxcvbnm11's Blog
  • sports1's Blog
  • shakil1's Blog
  • Wallabies vs All Blacks live rugby 2013
  • rugbyliveonline Blog
  • valobasa87's Blog
  • valobasa87's Blog
  • kapur90's Blog
  • shodes' Blog
  • Maç özeti izle
  • rejunakhan's Blog
  • LiveAFLRugbyonlinestream
  • Sports 2013
  • messibarsha79's Blog
  • mone's Blog
  • MISTY1's Blog
  • sometimo5's Blog
  • Rojario's Blog
  • AGUNKHAN's Blog
  • ((Broadcast)) London Marathon live stream- 2013
  • Manchester United vs Aston Villa
  • Bayern Barcelone streaming Bayern Munich Barcelone streaming live en direct 23 Avril 2013
  • Bayern Barca Streaming 23 avril 2013
  • Bayern Barcelone streaming 23 avril 2013
  • Bayern vs Barcelone en direct 23 avril 2013

Found 5 results

  1. By Dylan Barmmer Chris Bosh has been and done and seen and played a lot during his 11-year NBA career. There's the 8 All-Star Game appearances. The 5 consecutive seasons averaging at least 22.3 points and 8.7 rebounds per game. The 3 seasons averaging "20 and 10" a game. And the 3 NBA Finals appearances in his first 3 seasons with the HEAT – with each of the last 2 culminating in NBA Championships. The HEAT's decorated 29-year-old center also stands 6-foot-11, with a long wingspan and an often passionate, demonstrative approach to the game of basketball, which he clearly loves. He's averaged over 30 minutes per game in each of his 11 NBA seasons, has been a starter in all but 12 games during his rookie season, and rarely misses a game – despite banging with big, bruising bodies in the low post for many of those 30-plus minutes. Yet on a team loaded with stars and decorated veterans, and headlined by reigning NBA MVP LeBron James, Bosh can at times be overlooked. Even in the biggest moments of the biggest games on the biggest stages. While Ray Allen's game-saving, step-back 3-pointer late in Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals rightfully received the lion's share of attention while recapping that historic game in that historic series, if not for Bosh's heady offensive rebound and instant, accurate pass to Allen, the shot never even goes off, yet alone goes down. Bosh secured that board, then whipped the ball perfectly out to Allen, whose now-legendary shot knotted the score at 95-95 with just 5.2 seconds left on the regulation game clock. The HEAT went on to claim a 103-100 win in Game 6 and force a Game 7, which they won 95-88 to capture their second consecutive NBA Championship. Bosh finished that thrilling Game 6 with 10 points, a HEAT-high 11 rebounds, 2 assists and a game-high 2 blocks – a strong stat line that was lost in the brilliant flash of Allen's game- and season-saving long ball and James' 32-point, 11-assist, 10-rebound NBA Finals triple-double. In the 2013 NBA Finals as a whole, Bosh averaged 11.9 points, 8.9 rebounds, 2.1 assists, 1.9 steals and 1.6 blocks. He scored 12 or more points in 5 of the 7 games, and pulled down 10 or more rebounds against the towering Spurs in 4 games. Not coincidentally, the HEAT won 3 of those 4 games, including that now-legendary Game 6 that kept their now-legendary season alive. Bosh didn't get a whole lot of outside acclaim for his role in the thrilling Finals win, but with the do-everything-and-do-it-all-at-another-level James on the floor, it's awfully easy to overlook anybody and everybody else in a HEAT uniform. The ability of other established stars like Bosh, Allen and Dwyane Wade to sacrifice egos, shot attempts, highlights and headlines for the greater glory of the team has been instrumental in a remarkable run of success that has seen the HEAT capture back-to-back NBA Championships and begin the 2013-14 season with a 27-11 record. Bosh has gladly sacrificed some superstar status since he joined the HEAT fold, and has equally demonstrated an ability to come up bigger than his 6-foot-11 frame when his number is called. On the rare occasion when James does miss a game, HEAT fans, players, coaches and anyone else watching are often vividly reminded of just how talented, versatile and brilliant a basketball player Bosh is. Take, for example, a riveting 108-107 HEAT victory over the red-hot Trail Blazers in Portland in the final days of the 2013 portion of this season's schedule. Maybe no game in his HEAT tenure truly encapsulated Bosh's extensive skill set, unique versatility and undeniable value quite like that roaring comeback win on Dec. 28, 2013. With James out with a strained right groin and reserve sparkplug Chris Andersen sidelined with a sore back – and Wade and Allen both playing after sitting out the previous game – Bosh absolutely took over, scoring a season- and game-high 37 points, grabbing a HEAT-high 10 rebounds and drilling 15-of-26 field goals – including a game-winning 3-pointer with just 0.5 seconds remaining on the game clock, and the HEAT down 107-105 at the time. Bosh was 3-for-3 from long-range in the game, with all of his 3-point hits coming in the fourth quarter. Bosh's first long-range dagger knotted the game at 96-96, the second put the HEAT up 101-98 with 2:03 left to play, and the last and biggest one gave the HEAT their 23rd win in their first 30 games – while handing the Trail Blazers just their sixth loss in 30 games, and only their third in 15 games on their homecourt. Bosh also did an admirable job defending talented Trail Blazers center LaMarcus Aldridge, limiting the versatile big man to 22 points (on 9-of-20 shooting) and 7 rebounds. Afterward, HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra had high praise for Bosh, who seems to be getting better and better as the 2013-14 season progresses. "He was terrific tonight, a true two-way player," said Spoelstra. "He took the challenge for the majority of his minutes on one of the premier players in this league, and then had to shoulder a big-time offensive load. That takes incredible stamina but also the skill set that he put on display tonight on both ends of the court." Bosh has been displaying more and more of that stamina and skill as his fourth season in a HEAT uniform unfolds, with his performances in December games particularly impressive. The HEAT went 11-4 in a tough December slate that included 8 games on the road and 5 games without the services of Wade, and Bosh scored 20 or more points in 6 of those 11 HEAT victories. Bosh also hauled down at least 8 rebounds in 8 of those 11 wins, and logged 5 overall games in December with at least 2 blocks. Bosh's overall December numbers were stellar: 18.0 points per game, 7.3 rebounds, 1.1 blocks, 1.1 assists, 1.1 steals and a 54.4-percent shooting mark from the field. Perhaps most importantly for the HEAT, he played in all 15 December games, averaging 31.3 minutes per game. Of course, Bosh's ultimate value to the HEAT goes well beyond mere statistics, as HEAT fans, coaches and teammates know by now. The long, lanky, smart, savvy veteran is capable of playing either the center or power forward position, and his left-handed shooting stroke is at times so effective, efficient, lethal and beautiful, he resembles something more like a shooting guard in Spoelstra's exciting, innovative and "positionless" offense. Bosh has always been an incredibly effective shooter, as his career 49.7-percent mark from the field attests. But during his time in a HEAT uniform, Bosh has been remarkably efficient, especially over the past few seasons. He shot a career-high 53.5 percent from the field over 74 regular-season games in 2012-13, and through 37 games played this season, he's connecting at a 52.2-percent clip. Bosh just keeps getting better as a shooter as his NBA career evolves, and last season, he easily eclipsed his previous career-highs for 3-pointers attempted (74) and made (21) in a single season. He's already set a new personal best for made 3-pointers with 23 long-distance hits this season, and is well on pace to eclipse his own record for 3-point attempts, with 66 so far. Bosh's 23-for-66 shooting from behind the 3-point arc equates to a 34.8-percent clip. That's impressive for an NBA guard, and something closer to incredible for a big man. The win at Portland – which Wade termed "a signature win" afterward – wasn't the first time Bosh's budding long-range acumen resulted in a thrilling late-game victory for the HEAT this season. In fact, it was the second time in December that Bosh bailed out the HEAT with his 3-point sharpshooting. During a 99-98 win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Dec. 1, Bosh drilled 3 straight 3-pointers during a blistering 79-second stretch of the fourth quarter, sparking a 38-point fourth quarter that erased a Bobcats lead that had stood for over 23 minutes. All told, Bosh scored 13 consecutive points for the HEAT, and finished with 22 points and 9 rebounds. His 22 points came on an incredibly efficient 8-of-13 shooting from the field, including 3-of-4 from long-distance. Overall this season, Bosh has averaged 15.7 points, 6.7 rebounds, 1.1 blocks, 0.8 steals and 1.1 assists over 30.8 minutes per game to help key the HEAT to a 27-11 start. He is tied with James for the HEAT lead in rebounding per games, is just a shade behind Andersen for the lead in blocks per game, and is third in both points and minutes per game behind James and Wade. His 52.2-percent shooting mark from the field is fifth-best on the sweet-shooting HEAT, and he ranks seventh on the club with 23 3-point field goals made. Whether he's pulling down a key rebound, throwing down a monster dunk, swishing a clutch fourth-quarter three-pointer, or stifling the other team's big man on the defensive end, Chris Bosh can be counted on to do and be a little bit of everything for the HEAT. That's the kind of value you can't ever really quantify. And in Bosh, that's what the HEAT have.
  2. By Dylan Barmmer Last year, he provided a mid-season jolt that helped carry the HEAT to a record-setting regular season and a second consecutive NBA Championship. This season, versatile veteran big man Chris Andersen has been with the HEAT from training camp to opening night and beyond. And the results have been equally impressive. A few weeks into the second full month of the 2013-14 NBA season, the HEAT have a 16-5 record that includes a 10-game winning streak, and Andersen was a big reason for that sizzling success. Just as he was last season, when the HEAT ripped off an NBA-best and franchise-record 27-game winning streak that helped power them to a 66-16 record that also led the league and set a new franchise standard. The 35-year-old forward/center is averaging 6.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 1.2 blocks, 0.5 assists and 0.4 steals – all in just 17.5 minutes per game off the HEAT bench. Andersen has appeared in 20 of the HEAT's 21 games, and currently leads all HEAT reserves in blocks and rebounding – and is first and fourth, respectively, on the entire HEAT team in those two categories. His scoring average ranks fourth among HEAT reserves, and his 64.1-percent field goal shooting leads all HEAT players. The rangy, electric, eclectic, 6-foot-10, 228-pound Andersen was also doing all of this despite playing in his 12th NBA season. His high-energy, stat-stuffing performances continue to build off an electric first season with the HEAT that saw him average 4.9 points, 4.1 rebounds, 1.0 blocks, 0.4 assists and 0.4 steals and shoot a career-high 57.7 percent from the field in 14.9 minutes per game over 42 regular-season games. Even more impressively, the HEAT won 39 of those 42 games, which equates to an eye-popping winning percentage of 92.9 percent. Andersen has scored 10 or more points in 6 of his 20 appearances off the HEAT bench this season, pulled down at least 5 rebounds in 9 different games, and blocked at least one shot 13 different times. Not coincidentally, the HEAT won all but one of those games, with the lone loss coming on a last-second 3-pointer from Boston's Gerald Green in a 111-110 defeat on Nov. 9. The HEAT would go on to win their next 10 games following that defeat, and Andersen would play a major role in that run. Andersen averaged 6.1 points, 4.9 rebounds, 1.3 blocks and 0.5 assists in 17.8 minutes as the HEAT ripped off 10 consecutive victories from Nov. 12 through Dec. 1. Andersen hit 61.5 percent of his shots from the field and 72.2 percent of his free-throw attempts during that run, and turned in a few exceptional overall efforts off the HEAT bench. Andersen scored 10 points, grabbed 7 rebounds and blocked 2 shots in a season-high 24 minutes of a 97-81 win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Nov. 16, then turned in a 10-point, 5-rebound, 2-block gem in 18 minutes of a 120-92 victory at Orlando 4 nights later. On Nov. 25, Andersen scored a season-high 11 points, pulled down 7 rebounds and blocked 1 shot in 19 minutes of a 107-92 win over the Phoenix Suns. Then 4 nights later, he racked up 5 points, 4 rebounds, 2 blocks and 1 assist in a 90-83 win over the Toronto Raptors that pushed the HEAT's winning streak to 9 games. Even in the game that snapped the HEAT's 10-game winning streak, Andersen came up big off the bench, especially in the fourth quarter. The HEAT fell 107-97 to a determined Detroit Pistons team on Dec. 3, but Andersen poured in 8 points, 4 rebounds, 1 assist and 1 steal in 16 strong minutes of action. Andersen was on the floor as the HEAT mounted a furious 18-6 run to pull within 91-86 with 6:45 left to play in the game, and he seemed to be everywhere during that surge – scoring, rebounding, defending and even tipping in a missed Michael Beasley free throw for a big basket. That game also marked Andersen's 60th regular-season game in a HEAT uniform. The HEAT posted a dominating 53-7 record during that 60-game stretch, which translates to an incredible 88.3-percent success rate. Andersen's many contributions, veteran savvy and seemingly endless energy come as no surprise now to HEAT fans, coaches and teammates, who watched the colorful big man follow up that splendid regular-season with a truly historic playoff performance. Andersen averaged 6.4 points, 3.8 rebounds, 1.1 blocks and 0.5 steals in 15.2 minutes per game over 20 postseason appearances, and his high-octane energy, fearless post play and near-flawless shooting served as key components in the HEAT's thrilling defense of their NBA Championship. In fact, Andersen's shooting – an incredible 80.7 percent from the field – set a new NBA Playoffs record for field goal percentage, besting James Donaldson's 75-percent mark over just 10 games of action for the Dallas Mavericks in 1986. It also put him in a rarefied air among HEAT legends, as former perennial NBA All-Star and current HEAT Vice President of Player Programs Alonzo Mourning shot 70.5 percent from the field in 15 games of the 2005 Playoffs, and hit on 70.3 percent of his field goal attempts in 21 postseason games in the 2006 NBA Playoffs, when the HEAT claimed the franchise's first-ever NBA Championship. All told, the HEAT went 15-5 in the 2013 NBA Playoffs with Andersen on the floor, and when you combine that 15-5 postseason mark with the 55-17 regular-season record the HEAT now boast when Andersen sees some court time, you're left looking at an overall record of 70-12 in Andersen's first 82 appearances in a HEAT uniform. Nobody would claim that Andersen is the prime reason for that superior 85.4-percent success rate – but no astute observer would claim that he doesn't factor signficantly into all that winning either. On a team populated heavily by perimeter players and accomplished outside shooters, Andersen's hard-driving, board-crashing, rim-protecting and all-out assaulting style of play provides a dimension and flavor that is immensely valuable and, at times, seemingly contagious. Andersen's incredible energy, rangy versatility, veteran smarts and experience and overall selfless style of play are also the kinds of qualities that cannot be measured merely by numbers, and it's apparent to all who have watched the HEAT closely over the past few seasons that Andersen is a special kind of player – one who is capable of being both a "glue guy" and a "hustle player" all at once. HEAT star and reigning NBA MVP LeBron James frequently sings the praises of Andersen in post-game interviews, often citing his "energy" and "basketball IQ" as prime reasons for another HEAT victory. Those same qualities have endeared Andersen to HEAT fans since he first joined the team as a free agent nearly a calendar year ago, and his entrances, exits and all-out efforts in games frequently draw lusty applause from the AmericanAirlines Arena crowd. Put simply, Chris Andersen knows how to play the game of basketball. And even better, he knows how to win. And is willing to do whatever it takes to secure a victory.
  3. Andersen Fitting Right In With HEAT

    By Dylan Barmmer His impact has been immediate. And his energy, electric. When the HEAT signed 10-year veteran forward-center Chris Andersen to a 10-day contract on Jan. 20, they knew they were getting a player who has always proven capable of providing copious amounts of both – the impact imprinting itself all across the court and the stat sheet, and the energy coursing out of seemingly every pore of his rangy 6-foot, 10-inch frame. But with Andersen having played only sparingly over the past few seasons (just 32 games for the Nuggets in last year's lockout-shortened season, and not at all this season prior to signing with the HEAT), and the colorful big man having turned 34 last summer, what was uncertain was just how much Andersen could provide to a brand new organization with a deeply ingrained culture and core group. And just how long it would take him to make a truly meaningful contribution. The answers? A lot. And not long at all. Andersen made his HEAT debut in a 110-88 home win over the Detroit Pistons on Jan. 25, five days after signing that initial 10-day contract – and 10 months to the day since his last appearance in an NBA game – and made his presence felt right away, scoring 2 points and snaring 2 rebounds in just 4 minutes off the bench. HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra held Andersen out of a 100-98 double-overtime loss at Boston two days later, and on Jan. 30, he was signed by the team to a second 10-day contract. Andersen responded by racking up 3 points, 5 rebounds, 1 block and 1 steal in 10 electric minutes of a 105-85 win at Brooklyn that evening. Two nights later, he scored a season-high 9 points (on perfect 4-for-4 shooting from the floor, and 1-for-1 from the free-throw line), grabbed 3 rebounds and added 1 assist, 1 block and 1 steal in 12 minutes of a 102-89 loss at Indiana. That would be the only game Andersen would appear in that the HEAT would not emerge victorious, as they sprinted into the All-Star break on a season-best 7-game winning streak that started with a 100-85 win over Toronto two nights later. Andersen had 1 point and 4 rebounds in 11 more active minutes of that game, and the next evening, he stuffed the stat sheet with 4 points, 6 rebounds, 1 assist and 1 steal in 16 live-wire minutes of a 99-94 win over Charlotte. Four days later, the HEAT knew they had seen enough, and extended Andersen's contract for the remainder of the season. That evening, Spoelstra granted Andersen a season-high 18 minutes on the floor, and he responded with an 8-point, 4-rebound, 2-assist, 2-steal masterpiece in a 111-89 victory over the L.A. Clippers, who entered that game with a sparkling 35-16 record. Andersen also played a key role in limiting Clippers All-Star power forward Blake Griffin to just 13 points and 5 rebounds, well below his season averages of 18.5 and 8.7. In his first 10 games in a HEAT uniform, Anderson has averaged a rock-solid 3.1 points, 3.5 rebounds, 0.6 blocks and 0.6 steals – in just 10.8 minutes per game. Despite being 11th on the club in minutes per game, he currently ranks fifth in rebounding average and sixth in blocks and steals per game. Andersen has also pulled down at least 4 rebounds in 6 of those 10 games – despite averaging just 12.3 minutes over those 6 games. And Andersen has managed to do all this while admittedly still working his way back into NBA-level conditioning – remember, he hadn't appeared in an NBA game since March 25, 2012 – and finding his ideal fit in the HEAT culture, both on and off the floor. Most importantly, the HEAT are 9-1 in those 10 games. Infused with a jolt of glass-scraping adrenaline from Andersen off the bench, the HEAT have also won the rebounding battle in 6 of those 10 games, including each of the last four heading into the All-Star break. Prior to donning a Heat uniform, Andersen had played in 482 NBA games, averaging 5.4 points, 5.2 rebounds and 1.6 blocks in a shade under 18 minutes per game for Denver and New Orleans. So his numbers are pretty much right on par with his career averages, which were compiled while playing for teams boasting far less overall talent than the defending NBA Champion HEAT. But much like more-established HEAT standouts Shane Battier, Udonis Haslem and Mario Chalmers, much of Andersen's value seems to come in ways that are not easily measured by statistical analysis alone. Andersen plays like a leaping, sprinting, blocking, rebounding, diving, defending demon. In fact, his all-out effort and intensity is so dazzling at times, he seems to be in two places at once. HEAT star and reigning NBA MVP LeBron James has publicly praised the "energy" Andersen has brought to the HEAT lineup on a few occasions already, and his frenetic frontcourt tenacity and rebounding acumen call to mind the style of NBA Hall of Famer Dennis Rodman, who was a vital and often underrated cog in the Michael Jordan-led championship Chicago Bulls teams. Then there are games like Andersen's last one before the All-Star break -– a rousing 110-100 HEAT win in Oklahoma City, where the Thunder had racked up a 23-3 record prior to that evening. A quick glance afterward at the box score reveals that Andersen scored 1 point and grabbed 4 rebounds – while racking up 4 fouls – in just 7 minutes off the bench. But to watch the game was to see Andersen's all-out hustle and assault on the boards help give the HEAT a decided edge in attitude, especially on the inside. And his aggressive and agitating defense on Thunder star Kevin Durant not only played a key role in the HEAT securing a commanding 63-46 halftime lead, but incited the capacity Chesapeake Energy Arena crowd into a lusty expression of disapproval. It remains to be seen what the rest of the regular season – and the ensuing postseason run – holds for the HEAT as a whole and Andersen in particular. There are still many moving pieces in the HEAT's frontcourt rotation, and on nights when matchups dictate the need for outside shooting over inside aggression, Andersen will likely find his minutes reduced. But no matter what happens, it seems likely that the HEAT have found at least the beginnings of a winning formula with Andersen, who wasted no time in resuming his already impressive NBA career with an instant flourish.
  4. By Dylan Barmmer It's not often that a 6-foot-11 man overflowing with talent and passion gets overlooked. Yet somehow, this seems to happen from time to time with Chris Bosh. Maybe it's because he plays alongside reigning NBA MVP and NBA Finals MVP LeBron James and high-flying franchise face Dwyane Wade. Perhaps it's because the league's all-time 3-point marksman, Ray Allen, has been making headlines and clutch shots since he joined the HEAT after five seasons with the rival Boston Celtics this offseason. Or maybe it's because Bosh is as humble, unassuming and down-to-earth as a towering, uber-athletic seven-time All-Star and former No. 4 overall draft pick is capable of being. It's probably a bit of all these things. And it's almost certainly no big deal to Bosh, who prefers to let his play do the talking. And through the first four games of the 2012-13 season, the 28-year-old Bosh has been playing at such a high volume, nobody can ignore the sweet sounds. Thriving in his new role as the starting center on a title-defending team, the one-time HEAT power forward is leading the club in field-goal percentage (58.3%) and blocks (1.5 blocks per game), and is second to only James in scoring (22.3 points per game), rebounding (8.0 rebounds per game) and field-goal attempts (60). Bosh is also second to only Wade in free-throw attempts with 20, and ranks third in free-throw percentage (hitting 18 of his 20 attempts from the line for an even 90%) as the HEAT have raced out to a 3-1 start. Bosh opened the season with back-to-back double-doubles in his new role, scoring 19 points and grabbing 10 rebounds in a 120-107 win over Boston in the season opener and chipping in 12 points and 11 rebounds in a 104-84 loss at New York three nights later. Then, the following night, Bosh turned in an absolutely electric performance in a thrilling 119-116 win over Denver with a game-high 40 points and 7 rebounds. The 40 points marked a HEAT high for Bosh, who hit 15 of 22 field goals in his breakout game, including 1 of 3 3-pointers, and was 9 of 10 from the free-throw line. He also had 2 assists and a steal in the win, which saw him score 20 points in each half and reach the 30-point mark with 7:28 remaining in the third quarter. HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra said later that he called only "two or three plays" for Bosh in that game, if that many. Bosh himself talked about being in the flow during the game...and boy, was he ever. Two nights later, Bosh scored a HEAT-high 18 points in the first half of a rousing 124-99 win over Phoenix, closing with 18 points, 4 rebounds, 2 assists and 2 blocks in just 25 minutes on the floor. Bosh drained 7 of 10 field goals and was a perfect 4 for 4 from the free-throw line. He also picked up the 700th block of his highlight-laden career. The 38 combined points marked the most Bosh had scored in the first half of back-to-back games since he racked up 38 from January 19-20, 2010. While the abundance of offensive options up and down the HEAT roster means that Bosh doesn't always explode for big scoring games, good things seem to happen with the HEAT whenever Bosh does go on a scoring spree. Bosh scored 20 or more points 22 times during the truncated 2011-2012 season, in which he made 57 starts, and the HEAT went 19-3 in those games. When Bosh scored 30 or more points, the HEAT were a flawless 5-0. As HEAT fans know, Bosh was highly instrumental in the club's Championship run last season, averaging 18.0 points, 7.9 rebounds, 0.9 steals and 0.8 blocks in the regular season and 14.0 points, 7.8 rebounds, 1.0 block and 0.6 assists in 14 postseason games (he suffered an abdominal strain in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals series against Indiana that caused him to miss 9 playoff games). Bosh fought back from the injury and returned just in time to help the HEAT vanquish the rival Boston Celtics in a grueling 7-game Eastern Conference Finals series, capped by a strong 19-point, 8-rebound performance in the HEAT's 101-88 Game 7 victory. Displaying toughness and talent alike, Bosh shone even brighter in the HEAT's 4-1 NBA Finals win over Oklahoma City, averaging 14.6 points and 9.4 rebounds and grabbing 9 or more rebounds in 3 of the 5 games. Bosh was huge in the closeout game, scoring 24 points, grabbing 7 rebounds and blocking 2 shots as the HEAT clinched their second NBA title with a 121-106 win at AmericanAirlines Arena. But perhaps the most telling stat was the HEAT's 5-4 record when Bosh was not in uniform last postseason. Without the versatile big man in the mix, the Pacers and Celtics were able to assign extra attention and defenders to James and Wade, and the HEAT had to work much harder on the boards, both offensively and defensively. All these numbers tell the tale of a player who is incredibly valuable to the HEAT, whether he's jumping center or manning the power forward position. But while the talented Texan's many contributions for the HEAT often jump out of box scores the way he sometimes explodes for a thunderous, screaming dunk in a manner that recalls the days of Alonzo Mourning, numbers don't often tell the full story about this unique player. Bosh's energy and enthusiasm seem to set the tone for the HEAT at times, and when he's really in the flow of the offense, the team becomes nearly unstoppable. Few players who stand almost seven feet tall can even begin to display the array of skills that Bosh embodies, and watching the 6-foot-11, 235 pound Bosh splash silky smooth jumpers, deliver pinpoint bounce passes into the paint and soar for emphatic two-hand slams is truly a joy for basketball fans -- especially HEAT fans. In addition to his lifetime 49.3% shooting from the floor, Bosh is a superior free-throw shooter, carrying an even 80.0% career average from the charity stripe. And over the past few seasons, Bosh has added the 3-point shot to his arsenal, draining 10 of 35 long-range daggers (28.6%) last regular season and a sizzling 7 of 13 (53.8%) in the HEAT's championship playoff run. So far this season, he's canned 1 of 6 from long-range, and with so many lethal long-range shooters now in the HEAT rotation, it's not a shot that Bosh will likely launch too often. It's clear that Bosh is a unique, efficient and energetic asset to the HEAT, and his continued evolution can only mean more good things to come for the club -- and all the HEAT fans.
  5. By Dylan Barmmer He stands a towering, sinewy 6-foot-10. He can step in and contribute at either forward position. He has the knowledge, toughness and vision that can only be gained from 14 years of NBA experience. He ranks eighth in NBA history -- and fifth among active players -- in made 3-point field goals (with 1,690 and counting). He has averaged over 16 points and 5 rebounds (16.1 and 5.6, to be exact) while playing for three teams in 934 NBA regular-season games. He has been an NBA All-Star twice, and played in the NBA Finals once (knocking LeBron James' Cleveland Cavaliers out of the 2009 Eastern Conference Finals as the star scorer for the Orlando Magic). And now, Rashard Lewis is ready for the next chapter of his highly decorated and compelling career -- as a member of the 2012 World Champion Miami HEAT. The HEAT didn't need to tweak too much following a blistering run to the franchise's second World Championship. After all, LeBron James won Regular Season and NBA Finals MVP honors while franchise face Dwyane Wade and versatile, valuable big man Chris Bosh helped stoke a red-hot run that culminated in a five-game triumph over the talented young Oklahoma City Thunder. Of course, life in today's NBA requires constant roster evolution, management and flexibility. So a few key pieces were added, with NBA all-time 3-point marksman Ray Allen and fellow silky smooth sharpshooter Lewis leading the way. Each veteran brings an array of proven skills, experience and insight to the already deep HEAT roster. But only Lewis possesses the rarest of rare blends of size and shooting ability. Not only is Lewis 6-foot-10, but he possesses a massive wingspan, and he's a career 45.4% shooter from the field, including 38.8% from long distance. It's not too many near-7-footers who can step back and knock down clutch 3-pointers. It's even fewer who can do so with enough accuracy, consistency and variety to rank among the Top 10 long-distance snipers in NBA history. But that's exactly what the 33-year-old Lewis has done during a remarkable career that saw him enter the NBA as a second-round draft pick of the Seattle SuperSonics (who later became the Thunder) straight out of Houston's Alief Elsik High School in 1998. Lewis went on to play nine seasons as a teammate of Allen's in Seattle, averaging over 20 points a game in each of the final three, including a career-high 22.4 in 2006-07. The following season, his first as a member of the Magic following a lucrative signing as a free agent, Lewis canned a career-best 226 3-pointers. A year later, Lewis led the NBA with 220 3-point field goal makes, and helped budding center (and new Los Angeles Laker) Dwight Howard lead Orlando to the 2009 NBA Finals, where they fell to the Lakers in five games. It was during that postseason run that Lewis helped the Magic knock off James' Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference Finals. Lewis went on to star for the Magic for parts of two more years before being traded to the Washington Wizards during the 2010-11 season. Lewis was limited by knee soreness during the lockout-shortened season that saw the HEAT roar to the title, playing in 28 games for Washington in 2012, including 15 starts. Lewis still managed to average 7.8 points, 3.9 rebounds and 1.0 assists in just 26.0 minutes per game. He ended up playing in 60 overall games as a Wizard, starting 42 of them. Now a proud member of the HEAT following his offseason signing, Lewis has patiently worked his way into the mix during the start of 2012-13 preseason play. Erik Spoelstra and his staff have gradually expanded Lewis' reserve role, and he turned in his finest performance yet in a 104-102 win over San Antonio on Oct. 20. Lewis scored a HEAT-high 15 points and added 4 steals and 3 rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench in the comeback win. He drained 6-of-9 field goal attempts, including 3-of-6 from three-point range, and scored 11 of his 15 points during a game-turning 27-point fourth quarter by the HEAT. In five games off the bench, Lewis has averaged 7.4 points, shooting 13-of-27 from the field, including 6-of-16 from long range. He's also averaged 2.2 rebounds in 19.6 minutes as he begins to find his rhythm and role while adjusting to a new team in a new city. Including two games in Beijing, China during a hectic preseason. Talk about long range... Lewis' range, ranginess, versatility, experience and team-first attitude certainly make for an attractive package, and Spoelstra and HEAT fans alike are excited to see what the veteran big man with the sweet stroke and unique skill set will bring to the HEAT as they gear up for what promises to be an electrifying title defense. As a new member of a tight-knit, successful and veteran team, Lewis' ideal role and rhythm will take a little time to crystalize, much as we witnessed with point guard Norris Cole during his fascinating rookie season last year. One thing is for sure -- it will be hard to miss Lewis when he takes the floor for the HEAT.