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  1. Photo Credit: Mike Ehrmann By Dylan Barmmer It is his turn now. As Chris Bosh heads into his fifth season with the HEAT, the versatile, intelligent and passionate 30-year-old veteran does so with 11 full NBA seasons, nine NBA All-Star Game selections and four NBA Finals appearances under his belt. Bosh also enters the 2014-15 NBA season as something else as his role expands beyond what it was before. Of course, Bosh has always been extremely valuable to the HEAT. During his first four seasons with the club, Bosh did a little bit of everything. And it all added up to a lot of everything for the HEAT, who reached unprecedented heights during that four-season stretch. Bosh averaged at least 16.2 points, 6.6 rebounds, 1.1 assists, 0.8 steals and 0.6 blocks per game in each of those four seasons. He shot at least 48.7 percent or better from the field, and 79.8 percent or better from the free throw line. All told, Bosh averaged 17.3 points, 7.4 rebounds, 1.6 assists, 1.0 blocks and 0.9 steals while shooting 50.9 percent from the field and 81.3 percent from the line in 287 regular-season games over the past four seasons. He started each one of those 287 games, logging at least 32.0 minutes per game and missing just 25 games over that four-season stretch. Most importantly, Bosh helped the HEAT reach the NBA Finals in each of those four seasons – and was a key component of the HEAT’s back-to-back NBA Champion teams in 2012 and 2013. During that stunning four-season stretch, the HEAT claimed the Southeast Division and Eastern Conference titles each season and compiled an amazing 224-88 regular-season record – which translates to a sizzling 71.8 winning percentage. Bosh came up big in the HEAT’s playoff runs too, playing in 78 games (including 74 starts) and averaging 14.9 points, 7.3 rebounds, 1.1 blocks, 1.1 assists and 0.8 steals while shooting 48.1 percent from the field (including 40.6 percent from 3-point range) and 79.0 percent from the line. His crucial rebound-and-assist in Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals set up Ray Allen’s now-legendary corner three-pointer that proved pivotal in forcing a Game 7, which the HEAT won to claim the franchise’s third NBA title. While Bosh accomplished all of this and more, he also did much of his playing, scoring, rebounding, defending and leading in the long shadows of franchise face Dwyane Wade and global icon LeBron James – who won the NBA MVP Award in two of his four seasons in a HEAT uniform. With the ultra-athletic James and Wade frequently facilitating and executing the HEAT offense and often anchoring the team’s defense with their incredible quickness, Bosh was often required to play a more complimentary and underappreciated role within the framework of the team. Many times, this role led to limited offensive touches, which in turn often led to modest scoring statistics. The 6-foot-11, 235-pound Bosh almost always impacted the game on both ends, however, using his rare blend of size, length, quickness, intelligence, power and savvy to do everything from finish rim-rattling dunks to drill corner three-pointers on offense and pull down gritty rebounds and rack up game-turning steals on defense. During the past two seasons, Bosh also worked extremely hard to develop his long-range shooting touch, evolving his game to the point where he drained a career-high 74 three-pointers in 79 games last season – before canning 30 three-pointers in just 20 playoff games as the HEAT again reached the NBA Finals. The versatile and cerebral Bosh also started at both center and power forward during his first four seasons in a HEAT uniform, never hesitating to do anything and everything HEAT head coach Erik Spoelstra and his staff asked of him. Many athletes talk about things like service and sacrifice for the greater good of the team, but few elite-level NBA players demonstrate these traits like Bosh. This season, with the departure of James to his hometown Cleveland Cavaliers, Bosh will get the opportunity to move to the forefront of the team’s offense. It remains to be seen just how the ever-innovative Spoelstra will utilize the always-versatile Bosh, but the veteran HEAT coach sounds excited about all the possibilities that await him and his team on the eve of a new era in HEAT basketball. “He probably has the toughest responsibilities in terms of doing everything,” said Spoelstra after a recent practice. “Being an anchor for us defensively, having to guard multiple positions and then offensively, yes, we are running some offense through him where he has to generate offense for us. But he is arguably our best facilitator also to get other people involved, and he has to strike that balance. And he also has to space the floor for us. He does all those things. It takes a highly intelligent player and a highly versatile player to be able to manage all those responsibilities and he makes that look easy.” In preseason play, Bosh has looked aggressive, assertive, hungry and motivated while serving as the focal point of the HEAT offense and the anchor of the defense. Bosh led the HEAT in scoring in four of the first five preseason games he appeared in, and also finished with a team high in rebounds in four of those five games. His aggressive play also translated to trips to the free-throw line, and his sweet stroke from there resulted in Bosh scoring 24 points on 24-of-32 shooting from the line. “He’s aggressive,” said Spoelstra. “I just like the way Dwyane and CB have been aggressive, getting to the free-throw line, getting into the paint. They’re both in attack mode, but they’re picking their spots. They’re so unselfish. It helps when your better players are unselfish, other guys can get involved. We just need to keep on working. Other guys are going to find their rhythm playing off of them and understanding how we want to play. It will take some time, but we’re committed to the process.” For his part, Bosh sounds equally excited about his new role on the new-look HEAT. He signed a long-term contract extension to remain with the club this offseason, and his preseason production has him feeling as confident as ever out on the court. “It’s going well,” said Bosh after a recent practice. “I can score the basketball. I know I can do that. I’ve always been able to do that. I’ve worked on my game a lot more in preparation for a lot more touches and I’m very confident. I have no problem with scoring the basketball. It’s just getting my teammates involved, making sure I keep those guys happy too. That’s more of a challenge for me. I can score; I’m not worried about that.” Bosh knows that striking that balance between scoring and facilitating is going to take a lot of hard work on his part. He also knows that Spoelstra and his teammates are going to give him every opportunity to serve as the go-to guy, which will require him to maintain a strong, attacking attitude at all times. “Last year was more when I get it, shoot it every time and it was more of a difficulty in figuring out when to shoot it and when to move it,” said Bosh. “This year, I have to get guys involved, so it’s a bigger responsibility to look for my shot, but put the team first. Of course I have to be aggressive. Coach is going to get me the ball where I need it, and my teammates are going to get me the ball where I need it, but I have to make sure that I’m moving the ball and finding that balance to where I’m getting other guys involved as well. They’re both difficult positions to be in, but you know I’m trying to get better and better every day at it.” Bosh clearly relishes the challenge that awaits him and the HEAT this season. He knows that while he must come out aggressive and stay aggressive, he can’t get too worked up or deviate too much from the natural flow of the game and the framework of the overall team structure and strategy. “I just have to make sure there is a flow to the game at first,” said Bosh. “In the first two, three, four, five minutes, I’ll take easy ones if I get them, but I can’t just be aggressive off the bat. It has to come through the offense and I have to make sure that the ball is moving side to side.” Such a disciplined, measured and studied approach will help not only Bosh, but his teammates – some of whom will be playing extensively together for the first time as part of the HEAT. As a player who has always sacrificed personal glory for the sake of the team, Bosh understands this as well as anybody. “So (at) the start, I’m trying to make sure we have a nice flow to the game, everybody gets in a rhythm,” said Bosh. “That way, if I’m successful in the post (and) they start doubling, guys aren’t touching the ball for the first time when we’re asking them to make a play.”
  2. By Dylan Barmmer He was born and bred in Miami. He has worn a HEAT uniform for all 11 of his NBA seasons. Only Dwyane Wade has appeared in more games in that uniform. He holds the HEAT franchise record for career rebounds. He has shone, stood out and even starred at both the power forward and center positions. But for Udonis Haslem, this season has been more about patience than production. And like it often does, that patience has started to pay off lately – for both Haslem and the HEAT. After playing sparingly and sporadically for much of his 11th NBA season – and not playing a single minute in any of the HEAT's 10 February games – the beloved and determined Haslem re-emerged as a valuable and versatile cog in the HEAT's machine in March. In 13 games in March, Haslem averaged 3.8 points, 3.3 rebounds, 0.4 assists and 0.3 blocks in 11.8 minutes of action. He shot a sensational 62.2 percent from the field in those 13 games, and pulled down 4 or more rebounds in 7 of those games. He also scored 14 or more points twice, and blocked at least 1 shot in 3 different games. Over his final 5 appearances of the month, Haslem logged at least 15 minutes of court time in each game. And more importantly, the HEAT won the final 3 of those 5 games – and went 8-5 in the 13 March games Haslem saw action in. Haslem has clearly been thrilled to be back in the HEAT's rotation in full force, especially when he's been given a starting role. In both of those 14-point-plus games, the hard-nosed and heady veteran scored 12 points in the first quarter alone. Haslem's finest all-around game of both the month and the season came in a 101-96 loss at Boston on March 19. Starting and playing 27 minutes, Haslem scored 14 points, grabbed 5 rebounds, dished a season-high 3 assists and blocked a season-high 2 shots. With reigning NBA MVP LeBron James sidelined with back spasms, Haslem started at center against the Celtics, and turned in an absolutely huge first-quarter performance that showed observers he still can affect the game in a variety of ways. Haslem helped stake the HEAT to a 34-22 lead after that first quarter, scoring 12 points, pulling down 4 rebounds, dishing 2 assists and blocking 2 shots in 11 high-impact minutes. Haslem hit 6-of-7 shots in the quarter, and finished a sizzling 7-of-8 from the field for the game. Haslem also played a large role in a prime-time, knock-down, drag-out, ultra-intense showdown with the rival Pacers in Indianapolis on March 26. Haslem scored 2 points, grabbed 4 rebounds and blocked 1 shot in 21 minutes off the HEAT bench, and the down-to-the-wire nail-biter ended in a narrow 84-83 win for the Pacers on their home court. Haslem's lone basket came during the tail end of a key 15-4 run that ended the first half and put the HEAT up 45-44 heading into halftime. But it was in the second half that Haslem seemed to really impact the game – in a less statistical but maybe more meaningful manner. While Haslem's statistical impact in that game was minimal, he played a vital role and left a decided impact on the game – particularly on the defensive end. Towering 7-foot-2, 290-pound Pacers center Roy Hibbert scored 17 points in the first half – including 13 in the first quarter. With the 6-foot-8, 235-pound Haslem willingly and valiantly bodying him in the post for much of the second half, Hibbert managed just 4 points after halftime. Haslem's recent resurgence has been as much about that physicality and presence as it has been about any conventional statistical impact like points or rebounds. Renowned for his toughness and intensity both within the HEAT culture and around the entire NBA, Haslem possesses the kind of Old School intimidation factor that you just don't see much of these days around the league. It's certainly the kind of thing that can impact and infuse the HEAT with an "edge" in more than one way – not just during the 2013-14 season's stretch run, but well into their postseason drive. Of course, Haslem can still score and rebound at a high level too. That was made more than obvious two nights after the Pacers grudge match, when Haslem started and scored a season- and game-high 17 points to go along with 5 rebounds during a 110-78 rout of the Pistons in Detroit. On a night when the HEAT were without Wade, Mario Chalmers, Ray Allen and Greg Oden – and the Pistons honored the 1989 NBA Champion "Bad Boys" at halftime – Haslem helped the HEAT take control of the game early, scoring 12 points and grabbing 4 rebounds in 11 minutes of a first half that saw the HEAT stake a 57-42 lead. Haslem actually scored all 12 of those points in the first quarter, drilling 6 of his 7 field goal attempts and helping the HEAT race out to a 28-23 lead after one. With the HEAT missing their starting backcourt and top reserve, Haslem was part of a first-time starting five that also included James, Chris Bosh, Toney Douglas and James Jones. And when the game was over, the HEAT had a 32-point win, James had his 37th career triple-double (17 points, 12 assists, 10 rebounds) and Haslem had his most productive and efficient offensive game of the season (he scored his 17 points in just 21 minutes, and hit 8-of-11 field goals). Haslem has been equally impressive in April's early going, starting all 3 of the HEAT's games and scoring at least 6 points while grabbing 5 or more rebounds and playing at least 25 minutes in each of those 3 games. The HEAT are 2-1 in those 3 games (with their only loss coming in double-overtime), and Haslem has averaged 7.3 points, 8.0 rebounds, 0.7 assists and 0.7 blocks while shooting a scorching 64.3 percent in 26.7 minutes per game. In a 102-91 win over the rival New York Knicks on April 6, Haslem scored 6 points, dished 2 assists and pulled down a game-high 11 rebounds in a season-high 28 minutes. That game also marked 7 straight starts for Haslem – and the HEAT improved to 5-2 during that 7-game run down the season's stretch. After sitting out stretches of 3 games or more 5 times, and having averaged just 13.3 minutes a game over 42 overall games (including 14 starts) this season, the soon-to-be 34-year-old Haslem will have plenty of energy to expend come playoff time. And as HEAT fans know all too well, the man known affectionately as "UD" has played some of his best basketball in a HEAT uniform in the intense crucible of the NBA Playoffs – where points, rebounds, defense and overall toughness and execution are always at more of a premium. Haslem's postseason experience is extensive – and then some. He's averaged 6.3 points, 6.1 rebounds, 0.6 assists, 0.5 steals, 0.3 blocks and 24.1 minutes in 122 career postseason games, including 78 starts. He's also shot 48.0 percent from the field and 71.8 percent from the free-throw line over those 122 playoff games, and scored 772 points while snaring 750 rebounds. Along with Wade, Haslem is also one of only two HEAT players to have been part of all 3 of the franchise's title teams. Haslem was a major factor in each of those 3 title runs, playing 66 games (including 52 starts) and averaging at least 4.8 points and 3.6 rebounds while shooting 45.5 percent or better from the field in each of those 22-game postseasons. During the HEAT's third Championship drive in the 2013 NBA Playoffs, Haslem shot a postseason career-best 59.3 percent from the field and averaged 5.0 points, 3.6 rebounds and a postseason career-best 0.7 steals in his 16.2 minutes of action. Haslem was particularly effective and efficient in the HEAT's first-round sweep of the Milwaukee Bucks, averaging 7.5 points, 4.8 rebounds, 0.5 blocks and 0.3 steals in just 17.0 minutes. He shot a sizzling 61.9 percent from the field over the series' 4 games, and scored 25 total points (making 11-of-15 field goals) in just 36 minutes in Games 3 and 4. When the HEAT secured their first NBA Championship to cap the 2006 NBA Playoffs, a then-25-year-old Haslem started 22 games at power forward alongside center Shaquille O'Neal and averaged 8.6 points, 7.4 rebounds, 0.8 assists and 0.6 steals. Haslem's role with the HEAT has changed since then, an inevitable evolution that always occurs in every athlete's career over time. But one thing about Haslem and the HEAT remains the same as it ever was: Whenever HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra decides to call Haslem's number, the rugged, reliable veteran will always be ready to go. And he'll always give the only club he's ever played for everything he's got. That's still a lot. And it's still worth an awful lot to the HEAT.
  3. By Dylan Barmmer Chris Bosh has been and done and seen and played a lot during his 11-year NBA career. There's the 8 All-Star Game appearances. The 5 consecutive seasons averaging at least 22.3 points and 8.7 rebounds per game. The 3 seasons averaging "20 and 10" a game. And the 3 NBA Finals appearances in his first 3 seasons with the HEAT – with each of the last 2 culminating in NBA Championships. The HEAT's decorated 29-year-old center also stands 6-foot-11, with a long wingspan and an often passionate, demonstrative approach to the game of basketball, which he clearly loves. He's averaged over 30 minutes per game in each of his 11 NBA seasons, has been a starter in all but 12 games during his rookie season, and rarely misses a game – despite banging with big, bruising bodies in the low post for many of those 30-plus minutes. Yet on a team loaded with stars and decorated veterans, and headlined by reigning NBA MVP LeBron James, Bosh can at times be overlooked. Even in the biggest moments of the biggest games on the biggest stages. While Ray Allen's game-saving, step-back 3-pointer late in Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals rightfully received the lion's share of attention while recapping that historic game in that historic series, if not for Bosh's heady offensive rebound and instant, accurate pass to Allen, the shot never even goes off, yet alone goes down. Bosh secured that board, then whipped the ball perfectly out to Allen, whose now-legendary shot knotted the score at 95-95 with just 5.2 seconds left on the regulation game clock. The HEAT went on to claim a 103-100 win in Game 6 and force a Game 7, which they won 95-88 to capture their second consecutive NBA Championship. Bosh finished that thrilling Game 6 with 10 points, a HEAT-high 11 rebounds, 2 assists and a game-high 2 blocks – a strong stat line that was lost in the brilliant flash of Allen's game- and season-saving long ball and James' 32-point, 11-assist, 10-rebound NBA Finals triple-double. In the 2013 NBA Finals as a whole, Bosh averaged 11.9 points, 8.9 rebounds, 2.1 assists, 1.9 steals and 1.6 blocks. He scored 12 or more points in 5 of the 7 games, and pulled down 10 or more rebounds against the towering Spurs in 4 games. Not coincidentally, the HEAT won 3 of those 4 games, including that now-legendary Game 6 that kept their now-legendary season alive. Bosh didn't get a whole lot of outside acclaim for his role in the thrilling Finals win, but with the do-everything-and-do-it-all-at-another-level James on the floor, it's awfully easy to overlook anybody and everybody else in a HEAT uniform. The ability of other established stars like Bosh, Allen and Dwyane Wade to sacrifice egos, shot attempts, highlights and headlines for the greater glory of the team has been instrumental in a remarkable run of success that has seen the HEAT capture back-to-back NBA Championships and begin the 2013-14 season with a 27-11 record. Bosh has gladly sacrificed some superstar status since he joined the HEAT fold, and has equally demonstrated an ability to come up bigger than his 6-foot-11 frame when his number is called. On the rare occasion when James does miss a game, HEAT fans, players, coaches and anyone else watching are often vividly reminded of just how talented, versatile and brilliant a basketball player Bosh is. Take, for example, a riveting 108-107 HEAT victory over the red-hot Trail Blazers in Portland in the final days of the 2013 portion of this season's schedule. Maybe no game in his HEAT tenure truly encapsulated Bosh's extensive skill set, unique versatility and undeniable value quite like that roaring comeback win on Dec. 28, 2013. With James out with a strained right groin and reserve sparkplug Chris Andersen sidelined with a sore back – and Wade and Allen both playing after sitting out the previous game – Bosh absolutely took over, scoring a season- and game-high 37 points, grabbing a HEAT-high 10 rebounds and drilling 15-of-26 field goals – including a game-winning 3-pointer with just 0.5 seconds remaining on the game clock, and the HEAT down 107-105 at the time. Bosh was 3-for-3 from long-range in the game, with all of his 3-point hits coming in the fourth quarter. Bosh's first long-range dagger knotted the game at 96-96, the second put the HEAT up 101-98 with 2:03 left to play, and the last and biggest one gave the HEAT their 23rd win in their first 30 games – while handing the Trail Blazers just their sixth loss in 30 games, and only their third in 15 games on their homecourt. Bosh also did an admirable job defending talented Trail Blazers center LaMarcus Aldridge, limiting the versatile big man to 22 points (on 9-of-20 shooting) and 7 rebounds. Afterward, HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra had high praise for Bosh, who seems to be getting better and better as the 2013-14 season progresses. "He was terrific tonight, a true two-way player," said Spoelstra. "He took the challenge for the majority of his minutes on one of the premier players in this league, and then had to shoulder a big-time offensive load. That takes incredible stamina but also the skill set that he put on display tonight on both ends of the court." Bosh has been displaying more and more of that stamina and skill as his fourth season in a HEAT uniform unfolds, with his performances in December games particularly impressive. The HEAT went 11-4 in a tough December slate that included 8 games on the road and 5 games without the services of Wade, and Bosh scored 20 or more points in 6 of those 11 HEAT victories. Bosh also hauled down at least 8 rebounds in 8 of those 11 wins, and logged 5 overall games in December with at least 2 blocks. Bosh's overall December numbers were stellar: 18.0 points per game, 7.3 rebounds, 1.1 blocks, 1.1 assists, 1.1 steals and a 54.4-percent shooting mark from the field. Perhaps most importantly for the HEAT, he played in all 15 December games, averaging 31.3 minutes per game. Of course, Bosh's ultimate value to the HEAT goes well beyond mere statistics, as HEAT fans, coaches and teammates know by now. The long, lanky, smart, savvy veteran is capable of playing either the center or power forward position, and his left-handed shooting stroke is at times so effective, efficient, lethal and beautiful, he resembles something more like a shooting guard in Spoelstra's exciting, innovative and "positionless" offense. Bosh has always been an incredibly effective shooter, as his career 49.7-percent mark from the field attests. But during his time in a HEAT uniform, Bosh has been remarkably efficient, especially over the past few seasons. He shot a career-high 53.5 percent from the field over 74 regular-season games in 2012-13, and through 37 games played this season, he's connecting at a 52.2-percent clip. Bosh just keeps getting better as a shooter as his NBA career evolves, and last season, he easily eclipsed his previous career-highs for 3-pointers attempted (74) and made (21) in a single season. He's already set a new personal best for made 3-pointers with 23 long-distance hits this season, and is well on pace to eclipse his own record for 3-point attempts, with 66 so far. Bosh's 23-for-66 shooting from behind the 3-point arc equates to a 34.8-percent clip. That's impressive for an NBA guard, and something closer to incredible for a big man. The win at Portland – which Wade termed "a signature win" afterward – wasn't the first time Bosh's budding long-range acumen resulted in a thrilling late-game victory for the HEAT this season. In fact, it was the second time in December that Bosh bailed out the HEAT with his 3-point sharpshooting. During a 99-98 win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Dec. 1, Bosh drilled 3 straight 3-pointers during a blistering 79-second stretch of the fourth quarter, sparking a 38-point fourth quarter that erased a Bobcats lead that had stood for over 23 minutes. All told, Bosh scored 13 consecutive points for the HEAT, and finished with 22 points and 9 rebounds. His 22 points came on an incredibly efficient 8-of-13 shooting from the field, including 3-of-4 from long-distance. Overall this season, Bosh has averaged 15.7 points, 6.7 rebounds, 1.1 blocks, 0.8 steals and 1.1 assists over 30.8 minutes per game to help key the HEAT to a 27-11 start. He is tied with James for the HEAT lead in rebounding per games, is just a shade behind Andersen for the lead in blocks per game, and is third in both points and minutes per game behind James and Wade. His 52.2-percent shooting mark from the field is fifth-best on the sweet-shooting HEAT, and he ranks seventh on the club with 23 3-point field goals made. Whether he's pulling down a key rebound, throwing down a monster dunk, swishing a clutch fourth-quarter three-pointer, or stifling the other team's big man on the defensive end, Chris Bosh can be counted on to do and be a little bit of everything for the HEAT. That's the kind of value you can't ever really quantify. And in Bosh, that's what the HEAT have.
  4. By Dylan Barmmer Last year, he provided a mid-season jolt that helped carry the HEAT to a record-setting regular season and a second consecutive NBA Championship. This season, versatile veteran big man Chris Andersen has been with the HEAT from training camp to opening night and beyond. And the results have been equally impressive. A few weeks into the second full month of the 2013-14 NBA season, the HEAT have a 16-5 record that includes a 10-game winning streak, and Andersen was a big reason for that sizzling success. Just as he was last season, when the HEAT ripped off an NBA-best and franchise-record 27-game winning streak that helped power them to a 66-16 record that also led the league and set a new franchise standard. The 35-year-old forward/center is averaging 6.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 1.2 blocks, 0.5 assists and 0.4 steals – all in just 17.5 minutes per game off the HEAT bench. Andersen has appeared in 20 of the HEAT's 21 games, and currently leads all HEAT reserves in blocks and rebounding – and is first and fourth, respectively, on the entire HEAT team in those two categories. His scoring average ranks fourth among HEAT reserves, and his 64.1-percent field goal shooting leads all HEAT players. The rangy, electric, eclectic, 6-foot-10, 228-pound Andersen was also doing all of this despite playing in his 12th NBA season. His high-energy, stat-stuffing performances continue to build off an electric first season with the HEAT that saw him average 4.9 points, 4.1 rebounds, 1.0 blocks, 0.4 assists and 0.4 steals and shoot a career-high 57.7 percent from the field in 14.9 minutes per game over 42 regular-season games. Even more impressively, the HEAT won 39 of those 42 games, which equates to an eye-popping winning percentage of 92.9 percent. Andersen has scored 10 or more points in 6 of his 20 appearances off the HEAT bench this season, pulled down at least 5 rebounds in 9 different games, and blocked at least one shot 13 different times. Not coincidentally, the HEAT won all but one of those games, with the lone loss coming on a last-second 3-pointer from Boston's Gerald Green in a 111-110 defeat on Nov. 9. The HEAT would go on to win their next 10 games following that defeat, and Andersen would play a major role in that run. Andersen averaged 6.1 points, 4.9 rebounds, 1.3 blocks and 0.5 assists in 17.8 minutes as the HEAT ripped off 10 consecutive victories from Nov. 12 through Dec. 1. Andersen hit 61.5 percent of his shots from the field and 72.2 percent of his free-throw attempts during that run, and turned in a few exceptional overall efforts off the HEAT bench. Andersen scored 10 points, grabbed 7 rebounds and blocked 2 shots in a season-high 24 minutes of a 97-81 win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Nov. 16, then turned in a 10-point, 5-rebound, 2-block gem in 18 minutes of a 120-92 victory at Orlando 4 nights later. On Nov. 25, Andersen scored a season-high 11 points, pulled down 7 rebounds and blocked 1 shot in 19 minutes of a 107-92 win over the Phoenix Suns. Then 4 nights later, he racked up 5 points, 4 rebounds, 2 blocks and 1 assist in a 90-83 win over the Toronto Raptors that pushed the HEAT's winning streak to 9 games. Even in the game that snapped the HEAT's 10-game winning streak, Andersen came up big off the bench, especially in the fourth quarter. The HEAT fell 107-97 to a determined Detroit Pistons team on Dec. 3, but Andersen poured in 8 points, 4 rebounds, 1 assist and 1 steal in 16 strong minutes of action. Andersen was on the floor as the HEAT mounted a furious 18-6 run to pull within 91-86 with 6:45 left to play in the game, and he seemed to be everywhere during that surge – scoring, rebounding, defending and even tipping in a missed Michael Beasley free throw for a big basket. That game also marked Andersen's 60th regular-season game in a HEAT uniform. The HEAT posted a dominating 53-7 record during that 60-game stretch, which translates to an incredible 88.3-percent success rate. Andersen's many contributions, veteran savvy and seemingly endless energy come as no surprise now to HEAT fans, coaches and teammates, who watched the colorful big man follow up that splendid regular-season with a truly historic playoff performance. Andersen averaged 6.4 points, 3.8 rebounds, 1.1 blocks and 0.5 steals in 15.2 minutes per game over 20 postseason appearances, and his high-octane energy, fearless post play and near-flawless shooting served as key components in the HEAT's thrilling defense of their NBA Championship. In fact, Andersen's shooting – an incredible 80.7 percent from the field – set a new NBA Playoffs record for field goal percentage, besting James Donaldson's 75-percent mark over just 10 games of action for the Dallas Mavericks in 1986. It also put him in a rarefied air among HEAT legends, as former perennial NBA All-Star and current HEAT Vice President of Player Programs Alonzo Mourning shot 70.5 percent from the field in 15 games of the 2005 Playoffs, and hit on 70.3 percent of his field goal attempts in 21 postseason games in the 2006 NBA Playoffs, when the HEAT claimed the franchise's first-ever NBA Championship. All told, the HEAT went 15-5 in the 2013 NBA Playoffs with Andersen on the floor, and when you combine that 15-5 postseason mark with the 55-17 regular-season record the HEAT now boast when Andersen sees some court time, you're left looking at an overall record of 70-12 in Andersen's first 82 appearances in a HEAT uniform. Nobody would claim that Andersen is the prime reason for that superior 85.4-percent success rate – but no astute observer would claim that he doesn't factor signficantly into all that winning either. On a team populated heavily by perimeter players and accomplished outside shooters, Andersen's hard-driving, board-crashing, rim-protecting and all-out assaulting style of play provides a dimension and flavor that is immensely valuable and, at times, seemingly contagious. Andersen's incredible energy, rangy versatility, veteran smarts and experience and overall selfless style of play are also the kinds of qualities that cannot be measured merely by numbers, and it's apparent to all who have watched the HEAT closely over the past few seasons that Andersen is a special kind of player – one who is capable of being both a "glue guy" and a "hustle player" all at once. HEAT star and reigning NBA MVP LeBron James frequently sings the praises of Andersen in post-game interviews, often citing his "energy" and "basketball IQ" as prime reasons for another HEAT victory. Those same qualities have endeared Andersen to HEAT fans since he first joined the team as a free agent nearly a calendar year ago, and his entrances, exits and all-out efforts in games frequently draw lusty applause from the AmericanAirlines Arena crowd. Put simply, Chris Andersen knows how to play the game of basketball. And even better, he knows how to win. And is willing to do whatever it takes to secure a victory.
  5. By Dylan Barmmer It's not often that a 6-foot-11 man overflowing with talent and passion gets overlooked. Yet somehow, this seems to happen from time to time with Chris Bosh. Maybe it's because he plays alongside reigning NBA MVP and NBA Finals MVP LeBron James and high-flying franchise face Dwyane Wade. Perhaps it's because the league's all-time 3-point marksman, Ray Allen, has been making headlines and clutch shots since he joined the HEAT after five seasons with the rival Boston Celtics this offseason. Or maybe it's because Bosh is as humble, unassuming and down-to-earth as a towering, uber-athletic seven-time All-Star and former No. 4 overall draft pick is capable of being. It's probably a bit of all these things. And it's almost certainly no big deal to Bosh, who prefers to let his play do the talking. And through the first four games of the 2012-13 season, the 28-year-old Bosh has been playing at such a high volume, nobody can ignore the sweet sounds. Thriving in his new role as the starting center on a title-defending team, the one-time HEAT power forward is leading the club in field-goal percentage (58.3%) and blocks (1.5 blocks per game), and is second to only James in scoring (22.3 points per game), rebounding (8.0 rebounds per game) and field-goal attempts (60). Bosh is also second to only Wade in free-throw attempts with 20, and ranks third in free-throw percentage (hitting 18 of his 20 attempts from the line for an even 90%) as the HEAT have raced out to a 3-1 start. Bosh opened the season with back-to-back double-doubles in his new role, scoring 19 points and grabbing 10 rebounds in a 120-107 win over Boston in the season opener and chipping in 12 points and 11 rebounds in a 104-84 loss at New York three nights later. Then, the following night, Bosh turned in an absolutely electric performance in a thrilling 119-116 win over Denver with a game-high 40 points and 7 rebounds. The 40 points marked a HEAT high for Bosh, who hit 15 of 22 field goals in his breakout game, including 1 of 3 3-pointers, and was 9 of 10 from the free-throw line. He also had 2 assists and a steal in the win, which saw him score 20 points in each half and reach the 30-point mark with 7:28 remaining in the third quarter. HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra said later that he called only "two or three plays" for Bosh in that game, if that many. Bosh himself talked about being in the flow during the game...and boy, was he ever. Two nights later, Bosh scored a HEAT-high 18 points in the first half of a rousing 124-99 win over Phoenix, closing with 18 points, 4 rebounds, 2 assists and 2 blocks in just 25 minutes on the floor. Bosh drained 7 of 10 field goals and was a perfect 4 for 4 from the free-throw line. He also picked up the 700th block of his highlight-laden career. The 38 combined points marked the most Bosh had scored in the first half of back-to-back games since he racked up 38 from January 19-20, 2010. While the abundance of offensive options up and down the HEAT roster means that Bosh doesn't always explode for big scoring games, good things seem to happen with the HEAT whenever Bosh does go on a scoring spree. Bosh scored 20 or more points 22 times during the truncated 2011-2012 season, in which he made 57 starts, and the HEAT went 19-3 in those games. When Bosh scored 30 or more points, the HEAT were a flawless 5-0. As HEAT fans know, Bosh was highly instrumental in the club's Championship run last season, averaging 18.0 points, 7.9 rebounds, 0.9 steals and 0.8 blocks in the regular season and 14.0 points, 7.8 rebounds, 1.0 block and 0.6 assists in 14 postseason games (he suffered an abdominal strain in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals series against Indiana that caused him to miss 9 playoff games). Bosh fought back from the injury and returned just in time to help the HEAT vanquish the rival Boston Celtics in a grueling 7-game Eastern Conference Finals series, capped by a strong 19-point, 8-rebound performance in the HEAT's 101-88 Game 7 victory. Displaying toughness and talent alike, Bosh shone even brighter in the HEAT's 4-1 NBA Finals win over Oklahoma City, averaging 14.6 points and 9.4 rebounds and grabbing 9 or more rebounds in 3 of the 5 games. Bosh was huge in the closeout game, scoring 24 points, grabbing 7 rebounds and blocking 2 shots as the HEAT clinched their second NBA title with a 121-106 win at AmericanAirlines Arena. But perhaps the most telling stat was the HEAT's 5-4 record when Bosh was not in uniform last postseason. Without the versatile big man in the mix, the Pacers and Celtics were able to assign extra attention and defenders to James and Wade, and the HEAT had to work much harder on the boards, both offensively and defensively. All these numbers tell the tale of a player who is incredibly valuable to the HEAT, whether he's jumping center or manning the power forward position. But while the talented Texan's many contributions for the HEAT often jump out of box scores the way he sometimes explodes for a thunderous, screaming dunk in a manner that recalls the days of Alonzo Mourning, numbers don't often tell the full story about this unique player. Bosh's energy and enthusiasm seem to set the tone for the HEAT at times, and when he's really in the flow of the offense, the team becomes nearly unstoppable. Few players who stand almost seven feet tall can even begin to display the array of skills that Bosh embodies, and watching the 6-foot-11, 235 pound Bosh splash silky smooth jumpers, deliver pinpoint bounce passes into the paint and soar for emphatic two-hand slams is truly a joy for basketball fans -- especially HEAT fans. In addition to his lifetime 49.3% shooting from the floor, Bosh is a superior free-throw shooter, carrying an even 80.0% career average from the charity stripe. And over the past few seasons, Bosh has added the 3-point shot to his arsenal, draining 10 of 35 long-range daggers (28.6%) last regular season and a sizzling 7 of 13 (53.8%) in the HEAT's championship playoff run. So far this season, he's canned 1 of 6 from long-range, and with so many lethal long-range shooters now in the HEAT rotation, it's not a shot that Bosh will likely launch too often. It's clear that Bosh is a unique, efficient and energetic asset to the HEAT, and his continued evolution can only mean more good things to come for the club -- and all the HEAT fans.
  6. Anthony Always Ready To Role

    By Dylan Barmmer The NBA Draft is not the NFL Draft. It doesn't eat up an entire long weekend. It doesn't stretch seven longer rounds. It doesn't regularly see future Hall Of Famers fall far below where they were expected to be selected. The NBA Draft has two rounds. One. Two. That's it. And if you're a second-round pick, especially a late second-round pick, the chances of you ascending to stardom are quite slim. And if you're not drafted at all...well, then you're really looking at an uphill battle for anything like a meaningful role. In fact, even sticking on a roster is quite the long shot. Which makes the story of Joel Anthony all the more compelling. The 6-foot-9, 245-pound Anthony is one of just three HEAT players who were not selected in the NBA Draft. And much like Udonis Haslem, Anthony plays an incredibly valuable and significant role. The starting center for the HEAT for much of the past two seasons, the 29-year-old Anthony is a brilliant screen-setter, superior shot-blocker and excellent all-around athlete. Whether starting or coming off the bench during his five-season stint with the HEAT, Anthony has always provided maximum effort and energy, and frequently disrupts the other team's offense with his aggressive and timely shot-blocking. Despite averaging just 21.0 minutes a game, Anthony is tied with Dwyane Wade for the HEAT lead with 1.3 blocks per game. Anthony has swatted away 2 shots or more in 23 of his 58 games this season, and the HEAT have a 17-6 record in those 23 games. He's had 4 games where he's blocked at least 4 shots, and the HEAT are 4-0 in those games. And in a thrilling 101-98 win at New Jersey on April 16, Anthony registered his 400th career block, already good enough for fourth-best in HEAT history. Anthony's offensive game is still a work in progress, but his average of 3.3 points per game is the second-highest of his five-year career, and his 54.6% field goal percentage is a career-high and leads all HEAT players. During the HEAT's current 3-game win streak, Anthony has averaged 7.3 points, hitting 8 of 11 shots from the field — while pulling down 12 rebounds and swatting 6 shots. Anthony is also a solid free-throw shooter for a power player, averaging 67.0% during his career and 70.1% this season. His average of 3.9 rebounds per game is also sixth best on the HEAT, and represents a career-high. All rock-solid statistics for an undrafted player. But even more impressive when you consider that Anthony didn't even grow up in the United States. And that the native Canadian once dreamed of hearing his name called in that longer, deeper, trickier NFL Draft (that dream was modified a bit when he grew 6 inches one summer to stand 6-foot-6 at age 16). Anthony's path to the NBA has certainly been a long and unusual one. After prepping at Selwyn House School and Dawson College in his native Montreal, Anthony was recruited by Pensacola Junior College. Following two years of relentless work on and off the court, he transferred to former powerhouse program UNLV, where he led the Runnin' Rebels in blocked shots as a junior. During his senior season, Anthony helped lead UNLV to a 30-7 record and an appearance in the NCAA Tournament's Sweet 16, and was named the Mountain West Conference Defensive Player of the Year. His average of 6.77 blocks per 40 minutes was second in all of NCAA Division I basketball. He even had a monster 13-block game against TCU that season — one of just 17 times a player has blocked 13 shots or more since the NCAA began compiling block stats in 1985. Anthony also averaged 5.0 points per game in his final college season, shooting 60.0% from the floor. Then-UNLV coach Lon Kruger called Anthony "the hardest worker we've had in 30 years." But that work ethic wasn't enough to earn Anthony an NBA contract via the Draft. So Anthony did what he's always done. He kept working. Hard. Anthony showed up at his first HEAT training camp undrafted but also undaunted, and the HEAT liked what they saw enough to sign him to a one-year deal in July 2007. Anthony made 24 appearances as a HEAT rookie in the 2007-08 season, averaging 3.5 points, 3.9 rebounds and 1.3 blocks in 20.8 minutes per game. He continued to log extensive hours on and off the court, making his sculpted body even stronger through the HEAT's renowned conditioning program. Anthony appeared in 145 games over the next two seasons, starting 44 of them. He averaged a career-best 1.4 blocks in each of those seasons, and in July 2010, the HEAT signed Anthony to a new 5-year contract. He appeared in 75 games last season, starting 11 of them, and averaged 2.0 points, 3.6 rebounds and 1.2 blocks in 19.5 minutes. He also shot a sizzling 53.5% from the field. Now a staple of the HEAT roster, Anthony has come a long way from Canada and Florida junior colleges. And he figures to play a vital role once again as the HEAT begin to gear up for a strong playoff run. "All the things that he does, we value," said HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra. "He's not an offensive juggernaut but he helps our offense. He's our best screener, he plays with energy, he gets up the court. In terms of our team defense, I don't know if there's five better centers in this league — in terms of speed and quickness, ability to cover ground, his intelligence — that fits into what we do." Anthony is definitely a great fit for the HEAT.
  7. Turiaf Powers His Way To Role

    By Dylan Barmmer Preparation pays off. And in the NBA, you never know when your number might be called. Veteran reserve sharpshooter James Jones reminded HEAT fans of the value of staying ready recently, scoring 18 vital points by draining 6 clutch 3-pointers off the bench in a 98-75 win over Detroit on April 8. Fellow veteran swingman Shane Battier has done the same all season, providing a little bit of everything off the bench and stepping in to start 8 games at various spots on the schedule during this grueling, compressed season. And so has Ronny Turiaf. He just hasn't been with the HEAT quite as long. Not even close, actually. Jones has had four years to learn the HEAT system, and adjust to his various roles within it. Battier joined the HEAT during the offseason, and has appeared in all 56 games this season. In stark contrast, the 6-foot-10, 245-pound Turiaf has only been with the HEAT since March 21. And before jumping right into the fire down in the low post, the rugged power forward/center had barely played all season. Turiaf was sent from Washington to Denver at the NBA trading deadline on March 15. The Nuggets immediately bought out Turiaf's contract, he cleared waivers, and the HEAT eagerly signed the 7-year veteran. Turiaf played in just the first 4 games for the Wizards, missing the next 2-plus months with a broken hand. In those 4 games, Turiaf averaged 1.5 points and 3.0 rebounds in just 11.8 minutes, shooting a perfect 3-for-3 from the floor. But when Turiaf signed with the HEAT, he was ready to mix it up again down low, and coach Erik Spoelstra wasted no time inserting him in the mix. Turiaf played 11:28 off the bench in an 88-73 win at Detroit, scoring 4 points and grabbing 4 rebounds. Turiaf also added an assist and a steal in his high-energy debut, and hit both of his shot attempts from the field. The 29-year-old Turiaf has continued to play a valuable role for the HEAT, even starting the past 5 games at center. In 11 games in a HEAT uniform, he's averaged 3.6 points, 4.1 rebounds and 1.1 blocks in 15.7 minutes. He's shot 53.6% from the field, and drained 6 of his first 7 shots. And every time he's on the floor, it's nearly impossible not to notice his powerful blend of energy, athleticism, aggressiveness and leaping ability. Turiaf scored 8 points, pulled down 9 rebounds and blocked 2 shots in 21:57 of the same game Jones dominated recently, and in his first start for the HEAT, he scored 6 points, grabbed 6 rebounds and swatted 2 shots in a 99-93 win over Philadelphia. Turiaf's sky-high shooting percentage leads the HEAT, who are shooting 47.3% overall as a team. The 1.1 blocks per game is second-best on the club, just behind Dwyane Wade and Joel Anthony's 1.3 average. And the 4.1 rebounds per game are good for fifth-best, just above Anthony's 4.0 average. In fact, Turiaf has pulled down 5 rebounds or more in 5 of his 11 games with the HEAT. The fast success shouldn't come as too much of a surprise to anyone who's followed Turiaf over the course of his career. In 7 seasons with 5 different teams, Turiaf has proved durable, productive and valuable, averaging 5.2 points, 3.8 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.4 blocks while shooting 53.0% from the field in 17.5 minutes per game. His most productive season came in 2008-09, when he averaged 6.0 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 2.1 blocks in 21.3 minutes for Golden State. All those numbers except scoring average were career highs, and Turiaf also appeared in a career-high 79 games for the Warriors that season, starting a career-high 26. That standout season came one year after he helped the Los Angeles Lakers reach the 2008 NBA Finals, where they eventually fell to the Boston Celtics in 6 games. The Lakers went 57-25 that season, and Turiaf averaged a career-high 6.6 points, 3.9 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.4 blocks in 18.4 minutes. He played in 78 of those 82 games, starting 21 of them. During the Lakers' 19-game playoff run, Turiaf averaged 2.0 points, 1.4 rebounds and 1.0 blocks while shooting 58.8% from the field in 9.8 minutes per game. Turiaf has had a rock-solid career in the NBA's trenches, certainly not the most common course for a player who learned the game on the tiny Caribbean island of Martinique before playing his high school ball in Paris. After his eye-opening time at Paris' National Institute of Physical Education, Turiaf decided to trek out to the American West, accepting a scholarship to play for upstart Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. Turiaf was a standout for four years for the Zags, earning All-West Coast Conference accolades during his final three seasons and WCC Player Of The Year honors after leading the conference in scoring as a senior. Turiaf averaged 13.6 points and 6.9 rebounds during his four-year college career, including 15.9 points, 9.5 rebounds and 1.9 blocks per game as a senior. After his decorated career at Gonzaga, Turiaf was selected in the second round of the 2005 NBA Draft, with the 37th overall pick, by the Lakers. He was a valuable and versatile member of the Lakers roster for three seasons, and a favorite of the notoriously demanding Kobe Bryant during his stay in L.A. Now, he's a key component in the HEAT's march toward the postseason.
  8. Appreciating Chris Bosh

    By Dylan Barmmer On a team saturated in super stardom, it can be easy to go unappreciated. And when it's your nature to be humble, team-oriented and private, the odds are even higher that you might get overlooked from time to time -- even if you're 6-foot-11, possess a silky smooth jumper, can jump out of the building and tend to play with raw, primal passion. But those who watch the Miami HEAT on a regular basis understand full well just how valuable Chris Bosh is. And, after a recent 3-game stretch without the HEAT's All-Star forward/center, national observers have a better idea too. The HEAT dropped the final two games of a post-All-Star Game road trip while Bosh attended the funeral of his beloved grandmother last week, and his absence was obvious in both losses. Then, in his return to the court Monday night against the Nets, Bosh immediately reasserted his value with his unique presence, scoring 20 points in just 24 minutes of the HEAT's 108-78 rout of the Nets, including 16 in the pivotal first half. The versatile Bosh scored at will both inside and outside, finishing a sizzling 8 of 11 from the floor and igniting the AmericanAirlines Arena crowd with his play and passion. Of course, this was nothing new for Bosh. The 6-foot-11, 235-pound Texas native did a little bit of everything during his debut season with the HEAT last year, averaging 18.7 points, 8.3 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 77 regular-season games, and 18.6 points, 8.4 rebounds and 1.1 assists in 21 playoff games. Those numbers weren't far off from his career averages of 19.9 points, 9.2 rebounds and 2.1 assists, compiled mostly with the Toronto Raptors, who tabbed Bosh with the fourth pick of the 2003 NBA Draft -- the same draft that saw Dwyane Wade go fifth to the HEAT and LeBron James No. 1 overall to the Cavaliers. The steady and heady Bosh has posted almost identical numbers so far this season, averaging 18.2 points, 8.1 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 36 games. He's also among the top free-throw shooters for the HEAT at 81.7 percent, in line with his career average of 79.9 percent from the line -- a remarkably strong percentage for a big man. He's logged 9 double-doubles, scored 20 or more points 15 times, and dropped 30 or more four times, including a season-high 35 in a 92-85 win over Cleveland on Jan. 24. But the most notable stat around Bosh this season may be that 1-2 record without him. Or maybe the 8-1 mark when Wade has been forced to sit out due to injury. In those 9 games, Bosh has upped his offensive game, averaging 25.6 points, 7.4 rebounds and 2.9 assists, and shooting a sizzling 59.1 percent from the floor. Bosh scored 22 or more points in 7 of those 9 games, and 30 or more in 4 games. The highlight was a virtuoso 33-point, 14-rebound, 5-assist game in 47 minutes of a 116-109 triple-overtime win in Atlanta on Jan. 5. Bosh even hit a 3-pointer to force the first overtime in that game, which saw the HEAT win without not only Wade, but James as well. In fact, Bosh has hit 7 3-pointers this season, one more than he hit in 77 regular-season games for the HEAT last year. How many 6-foot-11 players can claim to not only knock down 3s, but do so in crucial, game-changing situations? Not many. But then again, there really aren't many players like Chris Bosh. A fact that the HEAT and their fans won't soon forget.