Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'shooter'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Miami HEAT Message Boards
    • Team Talk
    • League Talk
    • General Discussion
  • Miami HEAT News and Articles
    • HEAT News
    • HOT Links
  • Forum in General
    • Administrative
    • Thread Hall of Fame

Categories

  • News

Categories

  • New Features
  • Other

Blogs

  • Courtside with WB.
  • AJ's Blog
  • Check This Out says ThunderDAN
  • DP's White Hot Write Up
  • The Hot Seat
  • herve.joseph1's Blog
  • Boshynator
  • efren7m's Blog
  • Ursweetheatfan's Blog
  • Efesaygın's Blog
  • 82-0/Miami Heat
  • corydemarcus65's Blog
  • jahmeek's Blog
  • MIAMIONFIRE's Blog
  • blackbone's Blog
  • SIGN DRE BALDWIN
  • anthonymoceo's Blog
  • EdCurryRules' Blog
  • HeatLeBronFan's Blog
  • The PULSE Blog
  • Juzzmiami's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • king dre's Blog
  • pow124's Blog
  • Markeyz1's Blog
  • jake03's Blog
  • the year of the heat
  • alexx's Blog
  • Big Ken's Blog
  • trevinotime's Blog
  • chewy239's Blog
  • LaughingLeoperd's Blog
  • DWarner4's Blog
  • Rechine's Blog
  • RUDY_#1DWADE_FAN's Blog
  • Heat at Celtics game
  • solomon's Blog
  • irish dwight's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • Anthonycortez818's Blog
  • OverRatedSuperStar's Blog
  • OverRatedSuperStar's Blog
  • Offensivemastermind's Blog
  • jaybeast45's Blog
  • jaybeast45's Blog
  • adpsnoop's Blog
  • Mrs Wiz's Blog
  • gailenna's Blog
  • mrterrylove27's Blog
  • 2011-2012 Playoffs Blog
  • LUCKY 7's Blog
  • starjack01's Blog
  • starjack01's Blog
  • Jin's Blog
  • kckc4733's Blog
  • kckc4733's Blog
  • Miami Heats James Jones Youth Basketball Shooting Camp
  • flareblitz2001's Blog
  • Roosevelt Clark's Blog
  • daniellecheech's Blog
  • daniellecheech's Blog
  • MichaelRedd's Blog
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • cubanjesus
  • jessie0402's Blog
  • Dele Cares' Blog
  • osttar's Blog
  • normalchick's Blog
  • normalchick's Blog
  • Heat Nation 707's Blog
  • Coach Potato's Blog
  • Eloii-Zsa's Blog
  • Eloii-Zsa's Blog
  • didierlebron007's Blog
  • jbjones' Blog
  • Simaq7's Blog
  • HENNESSYBLACK1's Blog
  • Ebel's Blog
  • DJ Matt's Blog
  • TideHeatFan4Life's Blog
  • Back to Miami for Games 3, 4 and 5
  • enitx's Blog
  • CJayMiami's Blog
  • uonib
  • binou's Blog
  • Draft Result
  • jaramillo10's blog
  • Cia's Blog
  • #Miami_Heat's Blog
  • bossturner's Blog
  • boca_fan's Blog
  • boca_fan's Blog
  • ardsman36's Blog
  • itzflyboi2007's Blog
  • okxs5's Blog
  • okxs5's Blog
  • zzz8975's Blog
  • bpu321's Blog
  • Scar's Blog
  • KingsReign2407's Blog
  • miami heat fan#1's Blog
  • DON HALL's Blog
  • MIAMI HEAT
  • Did Eddy Curry get cut?
  • Bush33's nba Blog
  • cuty_boi69's Blog
  • cuty_boi69's Blog
  • xygy01's Blog
  • xygy01's Blog
  • big-b1's Blog
  • john110's Blog
  • Bramm Miami Heat
  • huwuf5's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • heatfan2006's Blog
  • LeBron James 1's Blog
  • LeBron James 1's Blog
  • xanthe18's Blog
  • Hollywood As Hell
  • Brittina Cash Out's Blog
  • britgirl12's Blog
  • Katima's Blog
  • tere's Blog
  • rbyrne7's Blog
  • wety's Blog
  • Lil Durant's Blog
  • ayy_vonte's Blog
  • fangsiqi's Blog
  • yjxnews2010's Blog
  • Xcitement's Blog
  • Miami HEAT UK
  • HJV3O5's Blog
  • miami mike
  • Jshelton31's Blog
  • MiamiHeatRadio's Blog
  • MiamiHeatRadio's Blog
  • bookchen13's Blog
  • iSportsLife
  • Australian Miami Heat fans
  • YLT-MAC's Blog
  • DerekWiner's Blog
  • JoshKou's Blog
  • camisetas nba información
  • Thank you for the Memories
  • PATJ's Blog
  • city03's Blog
  • mp54254's Blog
  • mp54254's Blog
  • MsTasha's Blog
  • MsTasha's Blog
  • PATJ's Blog
  • www.MiamiHeatFlorida.wordpress.com's Blog
  • Miami Heat Offical Blog
  • 19heat's Blog
  • blueredgraydonval
  • Loriann's Blog
  • rjthea2210's Blog
  • otzgame's Blog
  • MariahFloria's Blog
  • riyad's Blog
  • riyad's Blog
  • koluma's Blog
  • zxcvbnm11's Blog
  • sports1's Blog
  • shakil1's Blog
  • Wallabies vs All Blacks live rugby 2013
  • rugbyliveonline Blog
  • valobasa87's Blog
  • valobasa87's Blog
  • kapur90's Blog
  • shodes' Blog
  • Maç özeti izle
  • rejunakhan's Blog
  • LiveAFLRugbyonlinestream
  • Sports 2013
  • messibarsha79's Blog
  • mone's Blog
  • MISTY1's Blog
  • sometimo5's Blog
  • Rojario's Blog
  • AGUNKHAN's Blog
  • ((Broadcast)) London Marathon live stream- 2013
  • Manchester United vs Aston Villa
  • Bayern Barcelone streaming Bayern Munich Barcelone streaming live en direct 23 Avril 2013
  • Bayern Barca Streaming 23 avril 2013
  • Bayern Barcelone streaming 23 avril 2013
  • Bayern vs Barcelone en direct 23 avril 2013

Found 7 results

  1. By Dylan Barmmer As the HEAT attempt to secure a third consecutive NBA Championship, veteran center/forward Chris Bosh has added a whole other third dimension to his seeming ever-expanding and awe-inspiring game. He is now a lethal three-point marksman. It's not too often that you find a 6-foot-11 post player leading his team in both three-point field goals made and three-point field goal percentage through two rounds and nine games of NBA Playoff action. And on a veteran-laden, title-defending team loaded with proven long-range shooters – including the NBA's most prolific three-point shooter of all-time – what Bosh has done so far in the 2014 NBA Playoffs is even more remarkable. After dispatching the Charlotte Bobcats in four games in the first round and finishing off the Brooklyn Nets in five hard-fought Eastern Conference Semifinals contests, the long, lanky, left-handed Bosh leads the entire sweet-shooting HEAT team with 17 three-point field goals made. His 17 hits from long-range have come on 35 attempts, giving Bosh a sizzling 48.6-percent mark from behind the three-point arc that also leads the club. Those numbers are spectacular on their own. But they loom even larger when put into proper perspective within the HEAT's whole. Ray Allen, the NBA's all-time leader in both regular-season and playoff three-point field goals, has connected on 12-of-36 shots from behind the three-point arc this postseason (33.3 percent). LeBron James, the reigning NBA Finals MVP, has drilled 15-of-41 long-range attempts (36.6 percent). Miami native and renowned three-point specialist James Jones has converted 11-of-23 long-distance looks (47.8 percent). As a whole, the HEAT are shooting an exceptional 38.7-percent from long-range in the playoffs. And Bosh, a player once known for averaging 20 points and 10 rebounds a game, is leading the charge – and proving to be a major factor in the HEAT's 8-1 postseason start. But even more impressive than the quantity of Bosh's long-range daggers has been their quality. Of those 17 strikes from behind the three-point arc, it seems like nearly every one has either keyed a comeback, sustained a run, or flat-out saved or won a game. In two of the HEAT's nine playoff games, Bosh has drilled four three-pointers – tying a career-high each time. In both those games, every one of those shots ended up making every bit of the difference. In the second game of the HEAT's first-round series against Charlotte, Bosh scored a postseason-high 20 points on 8-of-11 shooting to help the HEAT notch a 101-97 win. Bosh was a near-flawless 4-of-5 from behind the three-point arc, and scored four consecutive points (on non-three-pointers) in a key stretch of the fourth quarter of the tight game. In the fifth and final game of the Eastern Conference Semifinals against Brooklyn, Bosh netted 16 points on 6-of-11 shooting, including 4-of-6 from long-distance. Bosh scored six of those 16 points during a game- and series-ending 21-14 run that secured a thrilling 96-94 comeback win for the HEAT, and each of his two three-pointers was vital to the victory. Bosh drilled his first fourth-quarter three-pointer to pull the HEAT within 82-78 with 7:26 remaining in the game, and his second long-range hit quelled a 7-2 Nets run and brought the HEAT within 89-83 with 5:13 left to play. That corner three-pointer sent the AmericanAirlines Arena crowd in a fevered frenzy, and sparked a game-closing 16-5 run that allowed the HEAT to improve to a perfect 5-0 on their home floor this postseason. Bosh also snared two defensive rebounds during that sensational stretch run, including a crucial board off a Shaun Livingston miss with 22 seconds left to play and the HEAT protecting a 93-91 lead. Bosh has customarily done a little bit of everything to help the HEAT consistently win big games, elevating his game to an even more efficient level in the postseason. A primary reason for the HEAT's sparkling 8-1 postseason record, Bosh not only leads the HEAT in three-point field goals and shooting percentage, but is averaging 14.6 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.6 blocks, 1.0 assists and 0.8 steals in 34.3 minutes per game. Bosh leads all HEAT players in blocks – and has blocked two or more shots in four of the nine games – and ranks second in rebounding, second in minutes, third in scoring and fourth in steals. He's also shot 51.0 percent overall from the field, which ranks third on the club, and 74.0 percent from the free-throw line. Bosh was particularly exceptional in the series against the veteran-laden Nets, averaging 14.6 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.0 blocks and 0.8 steals. He blocked 10 shots and drilled eight three-pointers in that five-game series, showcasing an electric and rare blend of ability both near the rim and on the far edges of the perimeter. In the series-opening 107-86 win, Bosh helped set a dominant tone by scoring 15 points, grabbing a playoff-high 11 rebounds and dishing three assists. But it's Bosh's success from long-range that has generated the most conversation around league circles. After all, this is the same player who averaged at least 22 points and 10 rebounds three times during a four-season stretch while serving as the perennial Eastern Conference All-Star center and franchise face of the Toronto Raptors. And the same player who made a combined 50 three-pointers during his full seven-season stint in Toronto. While anyone on the outside might be anything from perplexed to dumbfounded to witness the 30-year-old Bosh's postseason success as a long-range sniper, HEAT fans, coaches and teammates aren't the least bit surprised at his continued evolution. In his 11th NBA season – and fourth with the HEAT – Bosh set regular-season career bests in both three-point field goal attempts (218) and makes (74), and his 33.9-percent mark from behind the arc was better than his career average of 31.0 percent. Only Allen, James and Mario Chalmers attempted and made more three-pointers for the HEAT, with Bosh even ranking ahead of veteran marksman Shane Battier (73-for-210) in both categories. Bosh also averaged 16.2 points, 6.6 rebounds, 1.1 assists, 1.0 blocks and 1.0 steals in 32.0 minutes per game. He ranked second in rebounding, second in blocks, third in scoring and third in minutes on the HEAT. As durable and reliable as ever, Bosh played in 79 games, missing only three contests all season. Only Norris Cole (82 games) played in more games for the HEAT than Bosh, who also shot 51.6 percent overall from the field – fifth-best on the club – and an exceptional 82.0 percent from the free-throw line, which ranked second to only Allen on the HEAT. Bosh's evolution from post power player to post-perimeter dual-threat didn't just happen overnight, of course. Bosh has put in a serious amount of work in practices and games to hone his burgeoning long-range shooting touch, and that effort and enthusiasm continues to pay dividends – for both him and the HEAT. After making those 50 three-pointers – in 168 attempts – over seven seasons with the Raptors, Bosh has drilled 111 long-range shots in 352 attempts during four seasons in a HEAT uniform. That's an increase in three-point shooting percentage from 29.8 percent to 31.5 percent since Bosh joined the HEAT, and he has attempted more than twice as many shots from behind the arc since his free-agent arrival – in three less seasons. Still, this season has seen a dramatic increase in Bosh's long-distance attempts. The previous season, Bosh set then-career highs with 74 attempts and 21 makes. A year later, and his number of makes matches his previous high for overall attempts. Bosh iced a few HEAT wins in December, 2013 with clutch fourth-quarter shooting from long-range, and was particularly effective from distance during the 2014 months of January (15 makes at a 38.5-percent clip) and February (13 hits at a 36.4-percent clip) – the latter of which saw the HEAT post a near-perfect 10-1 record. That success certainly has carried over to the postseason, which has seen Bosh nail three-pointers with previously unprecedented success. He was extremely effective in the first-round series sweep of Charlotte, canning 9-of-13 for a spectacular 69.2-percent success rate. While he attempted the long-ball with less frequency or fanfare, Bosh was also quite dangerous from behind the three-point arc during the past two postseasons – each of which culminated in an NBA Championship for the HEAT. Bosh drilled 7-of-13 three-point attempts for a blistering 53.8-percent success rate as he helped lead the HEAT to the franchise's second title – and his first as a professional – during the 2012 NBA Playoffs. Then, last postseason, he nailed 15-of-37 (40.5 percent) shots from long-range as the HEAT captured their second consecutive championship. In 67 playoff games in a HEAT uniform, Bosh has now shot 39-for-89 from behind the three-point arc. That equates to an exceptional 43.8-percent success rate, and is above his impressive 40.6-percent career playoff mark. Of course, at a rangy 6-foot-11 with a 7-foot-4 wingspan, Bosh has a marked advantage over any would-be defender when he rises up for a long-range shot attempt. Factor in the attacking, driving, slashing styles and abilities of James, Wade, Chalmers and Norris Cole, and Bosh certainly gets his share of open looks during the course of a game. But Bosh still has to knock down those looks. When he does, it changes the entire complexion of the game, pressuring opposing big men to drift further away from the basket and out towards the perimeter – thus opening driving lanes for other HEAT players, not to mention potentially leaving other long-range snipers like Allen and Battier open at other spots on the floor. Many times, Bosh will drill one of his long-range daggers after the HEAT have swung the ball around the perimeter in a virtuoso display of quick-strike passing. Simply put, Bosh was already a major factor in the HEAT's masterfully and creatively designed "positionless" offense. As he's continued to develop his sweet stroke from behind the three-point arc – and developed the much-needed confidence to accompany it – the savvy, super-skilled veteran has emerged as an even more influential and multi-dimensional element within Erik Spoelstra's playing rotation. When it's all said and done this postseason, the HEAT and their fans are hoping it all adds up to another big-time three: A third consecutive NBA Championship.
  2. By Dylan Barmmer Adversity is a part of sports. As is repeatedly proving your ability, durability and value. James Jones knows this as well as anyone. Much like fellow Miami native and HEAT veteran Udonis Haslem, the 33-year-old swingman had to endure long periods of sitting and waiting to contribute on the court during the 2013-14 regular season. And much like Haslem, Jones kept himself ready before seizing a late-season opportunity and running – and shooting – with it to earn a key role in the HEAT's rotation at the outset of the 2014 NBA Playoffs. After not playing in 31 consecutive games spanning more than two calendar months, the 6-foot-8, 215-pound former University of Miami star saw action in eight games in March and April. Jones played 25 minutes or more in five of those eight games, scoring at least eight points and drilling at least two three-pointers in each of those five games. More importantly, the HEAT went 4-1 in those games, winning four straight from March 28 through April 2. All told, Jones averaged 7.5 points, 2.3 rebounds, 0.6 assists, 0.3 steals and 0.3 blocks in 20.8 minutes per game over that eight-game stretch. He hit 20-of-42 field goal attempts, including an exceptional 17-of-34 (an even 50 percent) from behind the three-point arc. Jones finished his 11th NBA season – and sixth with the HEAT – with averages of 4.9 points, 1.2 rebounds and 0.5 assists in 11.8 minutes per game, appearing in 20 games. Jones, who can effectively play both the small forward and shooting guard positions, even made six starts for the HEAT during the regular season. True to his driven and determined nature, Jones wasn't content to merely shine during the stretch run of the regular season. So he came out shooting at the start of the 2014 NBA Playoffs. When given a chance to contribute early and often by HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra in Game 1 of the team's first-round playoff series against the Charlotte Bobcats, Jones seized the opportunity. In big-time fashion. Jones scored 12 points in 14 minutes off the bench in the HEAT playoff opener, drilling 4 of 6 shots, pulling down three rebounds, handing out one assist and providing a crowd-pleasing and team-lifting spark with his aggression and energy. All of Jones' contributions proved pivotal in a 99-88 win at AmericanAirlines Arena, as did the 1-0 series lead that helped protect home court and set a strong tone for a strong run at a third consecutive NBA Championship. Jones' contributions in Game 2 were less prolific, but he still made a tangible and important impact, scoring three points and grabbing one rebound in 11 minutes of action. Every contribution from every player ended up counting in that game, which ended in a 101-97 victory over a scrappy and athletic Bobcats team that routinely refused to back down or fade away. In the HEAT's 98-85 Game 3 win in Charlotte, Jones scored three points, dished three assists, snared two steals and blocked one shot in 17 active minutes. Jones' three assists led all HEAT reserves, and his two steals tied for HEAT- and game-highs. Through the first thre games of the 2014 NBA Playoffs, Jones is averaging 6.0 points, 1.3 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 0.7 steals in 14.0 minutes per game. He's drained 6 of 14 field goal attempts – including 4 of 10 from behind the three-point arc. This isn't the first time Jones has contributed to a deep HEAT playoff run, either. In the 2011 NBA Playoffs, Jones averaged 6.5 points, 2.5 rebounds and 0.5 steals in 22.7 minutes over 12 games, drilling a remarkable 45.9 percent of his three-point field goal attempts. When the HEAT won the franchise's second NBA Championship – and their first with LeBron James and Chris Bosh in the fold – to cap the 2012 NBA Playoffs, Jones saw action in 20 games, averaging 2.6 points and 1.0 rebounds in 8.7 minutes per game. When the HEAT repeated as NBA Champions to cap last year's thrilling postseason run, Jones saw action in nine games, averaging 1.0 points and 0.3 rebounds in 3.7 minutes per game. He also hit 3 of his 4 shots from behind the three-point arc. Jones' acumen from long range has long been his calling card in the NBA. He routinely torched teams with the long ball during his decorated days with the Hurricanes alongside Darius Rice, and he spent his first two NBA seasons with the Indiana Pacers, honing his deep ball under the tutelage of NBA Hall of Famer and current TV analyst Reggie Miller, who ranks second to only HEAT standout Ray Allen among the greatest three-point shooters in NBA history. For his part, Jones has averaged 5.7 points in 17.2 minutes over 556 regular-season NBA games, drilling 641 three-point field goals at an exceptional 40.3-percent rate. Jones' most prolific season from long-range came in 2010-11, his third season with the HEAT. Jones played in 81 games and set a career-high with 123 hits from behind the three-point arc that season, connecting at a sizzling 42.9-percent clip. This season, Jones shot a career-best 51.9 percent from long-range, drilling 28 3-pointers in just 20 games of action. Jones has been even more effective and efficient from behind the arc during his postseason career, which now encompasses an impressive 96 games – including 19 starts. Jones has drilled 70 three-pointers in those 96 games, connecting at a 40.5-percent clip. In 12 games over the past two postseasons, Jones has connected on 7 of his 14 attempts from behind the arc – an even more impressive number when you consider he has been in and out of the HEAT's rotation. Jones can also rebound the ball and play tight, aggressive defense when called upon, and his overall insight, experience and knowledge of the game are routinely praised by teammates and coaches alike. Of course, his willingness to continually prepare, practice, study and stay ready – while also supporting his teammates during down times – are valuable assets to any team, and Spoelstra has often compared Jones to a dominating and intimidating "relief pitcher." Both Spoelstra and reigning NBA Finals MVP James have praised Jones for his hot start to these playoffs, with James insisting the proud, professional Miami native – and recent University of Miami Hall of Fame inductee – will be "a key ingredient to our success in this postseason." Just what flavor or degree that ingredient ends up emerging as remains to be seen. But one thing is for sure as the HEAT passionately pursue their third consecutive NBA Championship: Whenever Spoelstra calls Jones' number, he will be ready to go. Ready to do whatever it takes to win. And ready to let it fly from behind the three-point arc.
  3. By Dylan Barmmer When talk turns to the HEAT among national observers, the names LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh generally dominate the conversation. But during the HEAT's exceptional and sensational run since James and Bosh joined franchise face Wade in the summer of 2010, many other men have contributed mightily to the success. Some call them "role players," while others prefer the term "glue guys." Whatever you call them, these players have filled key roles in the HEAT's drive to three consecutive NBA Finals appearances. And as the HEAT have begun their quest for a third consecutive NBA Championship by going 6-0 to open the 2014 NBA Playoffs, such supporting players have been equally instrumental. In the HEAT's first round series sweep of the young Charlotte Bobcats, it was Miami native James Jones who seized his opportunity to make an impact in a newly expanded role. In the HEAT's Eastern Conference Semifinals series against the veteran Brooklyn Nets, Shane Battier has gotten the call to contribute more. And just like fellow versatile veteran Jones, the 35-year-old Battier has taken full advantage of his increased opportunity. After playing just two minutes in all of the HEAT's series sweep of Charlotte, Battier was tabbed by HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra to start at small forward against the Nets. The decision paid immediate dividends – on both ends of the floor. Battier helped key a 107-86 win against the savvy, experienced Nets, scoring eight points, handing out two assists and grabbing one rebound in 26 minutes of action. Battier shot an efficient 3-of-5 from the field, including 2-of-4 from behind the three-point arc, in his first start since the HEAT's regular-season finale on April 16. He drilled his first shot attempt, a three-pointer from the right corner, to tie the game at 7-7 with 8:56 remaining in the first quarter, and he later played a key role in a 24-10 third-quarter run that put the HEAT up 70-54 and led to a comfortable win. Battier converted a layup in the opening minutes of the second half that put the HEAT up 50-43 with 10:37 left to play in the third quarter. When he buried another three-pointer from the right corner 2:25 later, the HEAT had a 55-49 lead with 8:12 remaining in the third. From there, the HEAT would mount a 15-5 burst that seemed to break the will of the Nets. The 6-foot-8, 220-pound Battier also helped limit dangerous Nets forward Joe Johnson to 17 points in 32 minutes of action. The sweet-shooting Johnson had averaged 21.9 points in the Nets' first-round win over the Toronto Raptors, scoring 24 points or more in four of the series' seven games. With Battier defending him for much of the game, Johnson managed just 11 shot attempts, including six from behind the three-point arc. In Game 2 two nights later, Battier nailed his very first shot attempt – a three-pointer that put the HEAT up 5-2 with 7:43 to play in a hard-fought first quarter. He closed the game with three points, one rebound and one steal in 19 minutes, helping the HEAT earn a 94-82 victory and take a commanding 2-0 series lead. And once again, he helped hold down Johnson, who finished with only 13 points on 6-of-14 shooting. Through the first two games of the Eastern Conference Semifinals series, Battier has averaged 5.5 points, 1.0 rebound, 1.0 assists and 0.5 steals in 22.5 minutes. He's hit 4-of-8 field goals, including 3-of-6 from long-distance. Most importantly, the HEAT have won both games, and now hold a powerful 2-0 lead as the series shifts to Brooklyn for the next two games. Battier's stellar contributions at both ends of the floor have come as no surprise to HEAT fans, teammates and coaches, who have seen the 13-season veteran do just about everything possible – in both starting and reserve roles – during his three seasons in a HEAT uniform. Battier joined the HEAT in the offseason prior to the 2011-12 season, and went on to play in 65 of that lockout-shortened season's 66 games, making 10 starts. Battier averaged 4.8 points, 2.4 rebounds, 1.3 assists, 1.0 steals and 0.5 blocks in 23.1 minutes of that regular season, which saw the HEAT post a 46-20 record. In the postseason, Battier was moved into more of a starting role, and elevated his statistical output. In starting 16 of the HEAT's 23 playoff games, Battier averaged 7.0 points, 3.2 rebounds, 1.2 assists, 1.0 steals and 0.6 blocks to help the HEAT win the franchise's second NBA Championship. He averaged a whopping 33.4 minutes per game during that Championship drive, and hit 38.2 percent of his three-point shot attempts. In his first full-length regular season with the HEAT, Battier averaged 6.6 points, 2.3 rebounds, 1.0 assists, 0.8 blocks and 0.6 steals in 24.8 minutes per game, helping the HEAT post a NBA-best and franchise-record 66-16 mark. He saw action in 72 of those 82 games, starting 20, and shot a career-best 43.0 percent from behind the three-point arc, finishing just behind Ray Allen with 136 hits from long-range. Once the playoffs arrived, Battier moved into an exclusively reserve role, and averaged 4.7 points, 1.7 rebounds, 0.5 assists, 0.3 blocks and 0.2 steals in 17.8 minutes per game off the HEAT bench. He also saved his best for last, scoring a postseason-high 18 points by drilling six three-pointers as the HEAT topped the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 in Game 7 of the 2013 NBA Finals. Battier nailed 6-of-8 shots from long-range in that game, including each of his first five attempts. "Reports of my demise were premature," quipped the quick-witted and humble Duke University graduate after that big-time showing in a must-win game. Battier continued to demonstrate his value this season, playing in 73 games and starting 56 of them. Battier averaged 4.1 points, 1.9 rebounds, 0.9 assists, 0.7 steals and 0.5 blocks in 20.1 minutes per game, shooting 34.8 percent from long-range – and draining 73 three-pointers. He scored nine or more points 10 times, and also drilled at least three three-pointers in 10 different games. Of course, Battier's value to a team goes well beyond the standard statistical accomplishments. A hard-working, aggressive and highly intelligent player and teammate, Battier is well known for doing much of the game's "dirty work" – taking charges, setting picks, keeping opponents away from the rim, diving for loose balls, executing inbounds passes and the like. His ability to knock down long-range shots also helps the HEAT space the floor and opens driving lanes for James, Wade, Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole. Battier's willingness to do whatever it takes to help his team win – including sitting out for long stretches of games, if not entire games – is as renowned in NBA circles as his wit, intelligence, versatility and long-range shooting ability. It's this special skill set that causes former coaches and current TV analysts Jeff Van Gundy and Hubie Brown to wax poetic every time Battier's name comes up, and it's what prompts Wade to call him "one of my favorite teammates of all time." It's also what compelled the then-Vancouver Grizzlies to select Battier with the sixth overall pick in the 2001 NBA Draft, making him one of seven HEAT players to have been tabbed in the Top 6 of an NBA Draft. Now, close to 13 years later, Battier is a seasoned veteran, an accomplished three-point marksman, a crafty, cunning defender and much, much more. Most importantly, he's not just able to do many things exceptionally well – he's willing to do whatever the HEAT ask of him to help the team secure its third consecutive NBA Championship. The odds are certainly in their favor. After all, Battier and the HEAT are both a perfect 2-for-2 since he first donned a HEAT uniform.
  4. By Dylan Barmmer Every now and then, an athlete comes along who not only amazes with his play, but inspires with his ability to sustain that exceptional level of play for several seasons. Ray Allen is one such player. In fact, he might even set the template. Or take it to a whole new level. Now in the homestretch of his 18th overall NBA season, and his second with the HEAT, the 38-year-old Allen ranks fifth on the club in scoring, averaging 9.0 points per game in his well-defined, well-executed and much-needed role as the team's primary bench scorer and shooter. Like a basketball version of a baseball "closer," Allen continues to come up big in big-time, late-game situations. And like a true veteran and "utility player," he's also served as the HEAT's starting shooting guard several times this season. In other words, Allen may rank as the oldest and most experienced player on the HEAT roster. But he remains one of the most vital and invaluable cogs in the well-oiled and efficient HEAT machine – a machine that has churned out a 109-30 regular-season record since Allen joined the fold prior to the 2012-13 season. Long-time HEAT fans and NBA observers are not surprised by this, although they may still stand in awe of Allen, if for no other reason than his endurance. Over the course of his transcendent career, Allen has won games, set records and capitalized the "shooting" in shooting guard – not only in the sheer number of long-range and big-time shots made, but in the pure beauty and flawless form of his high-arching and often back-breaking jumper. Naturally, Allen is near the top of the HEAT charts in three-pointers made and attempted this season. Only reigning NBA MVP LeBron James has attempted and made more than Allen's 74 hits in 207 attempts from long-range, and he's not too far ahead at 83 and 216, respectively. Allen also ranks sixth on the club in rebounds, fifth in assists and sixth in steals, averaging 3.0 boards, 2.1 assists and 0.8 steals. His 90.4-percent shooting from the free throw line leads the HEAT, and is on par with his truly remarkable 89.4-percent career mark from the line. Perhaps most impressively, Allen remains a model of durability and consistency after 18 seasons of high-energy and big-minute NBA action, playing in 53 of the HEAT's 57 games and averaging 26.4 minutes per game off the bench. That 26.4-minute-per-game average leads all HEAT reserves, and ranks fifth overall on the club. Allen has also started nine games for the HEAT this season, averaging 12.0 points, 4.3 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 0.7 steals over 32.3 minutes in those nine starts. Allen has shot an even 50 percent overall from the field, 36.8 percent from behind the three-point arc and 87.0 percent from the free-throw line in those games, providing a rock-solid fill-in for fellow veteran Dwyane Wade. And not content to be viewed solely as a long-distance or free-throw shooting specialist, Allen has also flashed his brilliant all-around skill set and sky-high basketball IQ by beating opposing defenders off the dribble and finishing with everything from twisting reverse layups to hanging short jumpers to the occasional slam dunk. Put simply, the man who once starred in Spike Lee's "He Got Game" still has game. Lots of game. Long renowned for his tireless work ethic, supreme conditioning, dead-eye shooting and overall intelligence, the 6-foot-5, 205-pound Allen continues to produce in the twilight hours of his remarkable career. Whenever that career will come to an end remains a mystery, but what is absolutely certain is that it will culminate with Allen's enshrinement in the Basketball Hall of Fame – and put him in possession of a made three-point field goal record that will possibly never be broken. Allen has hit at least 74 3-pointers in each of his 18 seasons, drilling 100 or more in 15 of those seasons and at least 200 in five separate seasons. It all adds up to a mind-boggling total of 2,931 career hits from long-range. If that sounds like a lot, it's because it certainly is. Historically so. In fact, that closing-in-on-3,000 total puts Allen nearly 1,000 makes ahead of the NBA's next most prolific long-range shooter, Sacramento Kings guard Jason Terry – whose 1,950 career three-pointers rank fourth all-time in league history. In fact, the only player to ever even come close to Allen's totals is current TNT broadcaster and former Indiana Pacers sharpshooter Reggie Miller, who canned 2,560 long-range shots over his own 18-year Hall of Fame career. Miller used to hold the all-time NBA record for made three-pointers. Allen passed him up in February 2011 – and has drilled nearly 400 more long-range shots in the three calendar years since. It appears to be only a matter of time before Allen becomes the NBA's first-ever Mr. 3,000. And as Allen continues to show, time doesn't seem to affect him like it does other players. The prolific three-pointer records don't end there, however. Allen has also drained eight or more three-pointers in a single game an NBA-record nine times. This season, he's hit at least three three-pointers in 10 different games, including four in three of those games. Allen's career success rate from long-range, an even 40 percent, is also exceptional. He's shot 40 percent or better from behind the three-point arc in 8 different seasons, including a team-leading 41.9 percent in the HEAT's franchise-record-setting and NBA Championship-winning drive last season. And better yet, his prolific presence seemed to be contagious. With Allen in the HEAT fold for the first time in 2012-13, the club set a new franchise record with 717 made three-pointers. Allen, naturally, led the way with 139 of them. Bolstered by Allen's sweet stroke from behind the three-point arc, the HEAT also led the Eastern Conference – and finished second to only Golden State in the entire NBA – with a blistering 39.6-percent success rate from long-range, and routinely put games out of reach with the long-ball en route to a franchise-record and NBA-best 66 wins. The three-pointer continued to be a vital component of the HEAT's arsenal in the postseason, keying a drive to the franchise's second consecutive and third overall NBA Championship. Of course, none of those playoff three-pointers was bigger than Allen's game-tying, season-saving, step-back shot to force overtime in Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals. It's amazing enough to play 18 seasons at the game's highest level. It's even more amazing to average 10 points or more in each of those seasons – something Allen will have accomplished if he can up his current average of 9.0 points by one point over the season's final 25 games. He's scored 10 or more points in 23 games this season, including at least 15 points seven times. Allen's most prolific scoring game this season came in a December 23, 2013 overtime win over division rival Atlanta, with each one of his 19 points proving crucial in a 121-119 victory. Allen started in place of Wade in that game, and went on to hit 7-of-10 shots from the field and 4-of-5 free throws, also pulling down six rebounds in 34 minutes of action. Allen was exceptional throughout the month of December, averaging 10.7 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.1 steals and 25.6 minutes in 14 games. Allen connected on 51 percent of his field goal attempts in those 14 games, and drained 92.3 percent of his free throws. Allen has also flashed his patented late-game "closing" skills once again this season. In the aforementioned Dec. 23 overtime win over the visiting Atlanta Hawks, Allen was fouled on a three-point shot attempt with the HEAT trailing 111-108 with 8 seconds remaining in regulation. Allen calmly swished all three free throws, and the game went to overtime. The HEAT went on to earn a 121-119 win, with fellow bench spark plug Chris Andersen scoring three of their final five points. In a Dec. 30, 2013 road game in Denver, Allen scored six of his 13 points over the final 5:08 of the game, helping the HEAT earn a hard-fought 97-94 win on James' 29th birthday – and without the services of Andersen, who was held out with a sore back. In a Feb. 5 road game in Los Angeles, Allen silenced the Staples Center crowd and helped the HEAT top the surging Clippers by scoring 11 of his 15 points in the fourth quarter. Allen was also the lone HEAT player to go all 12 minutes of that decisive final quarter, and a primary reason the HEAT escaped with a 116-112 win. Clippers coach Doc Rivers, who coached Allen for five seasons when both men were with the Boston Celtics, said after the game that Allen can "run forever." Of course, Allen has also worked his long-range and late-game magic in several crucial, compelling postseason performances. Twice in his storied career, he's nailed a NBA Playoffs-record nine three-pointers in a single game – dropping 41 points to lead the Milwaukee Bucks to a 110-100 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on June 1, 2001 and scoring a playoff career-high 51 points as his Boston Celtics dropped a 128-127 thriller to the Chicago Bulls on April 30, 2009. Allen also stands as the only man to drain eight three-pointers in a single NBA Finals game, and his 32 points in Game 2 of the 2010 NBA Finals helped the Celtics beat the host Lakers 103-94 to knot the series at 1-1. The Lakers would go on to win that thrilling series 4-3, avenging a loss to Allen and the Celtics a few seasons earlier. But what HEAT fans – and Allen himself – will remember and cherish most was Allen's game- and season-saving three-pointer in the waning moments of regulation during Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals. With the HEAT trailing the San Antonio Spurs 95-92 and just seconds away from their season coming to an end in front of their loyal fans, Allen took a perfect pass from Chris Bosh, floated back to a spot just behind the three-point arc in the right corner, and rose up to nail a season-saving, game-tying and momentum-shifting shot that he would later call "the shot that I'm going to remember for a long time." The shot knotted the game at 95-95 with 5.2 seconds left on the clock, and sent the white-clad AmericanAirlines Arena crowd into delirium. It also seemed to stun the Spurs, who would go on to lose the game 103-100 in overtime. The HEAT would go on to win Game 7 and claim back-to-back World Champion status, clawing back from a 3-2 NBA Finals hole to emerge on top of the basketball world. But that shot, in the closing moments of Game 6, stands as the defining moment of a brilliant NBA Finals series. Not only was it massive in magnitude, but Allen's deft footwork and uncanny sense of time and space amidst the chaos of those closing seconds ensured that it will always be remembered and related in league lore. "You can't put it into words," said Bosh afterwards. "He's the best three-point shooter of all time. And the fact that he was open is just unbelievable. He kept our season alive." Allen would finish his most recent postseason run with his second NBA Championship ring and sole possession of the all-time NBA Playoffs three-pointer mark. He passed Reggie Miller up for that distinction in the HEAT's first-round win over his old Bucks team, and will enter the 2014 NBA Playoffs with 352 career postseason three-pointers – none bigger than that last one. Until the next one, that is. Because when it comes to Allen, there's always more in store. There's always another game to be played. There's always another big shot waiting in the wings. Or atop the arc. Allen turns 39 on July 20, and he would love nothing more than to celebrate his second NBA Championship in a HEAT uniform shortly before that birthday. Whether he reaches that goal or not remains to be seen. But one thing is beyond a shadow of a doubt: He'll give it his very best shot.
  5. By Dylan Barmmer Call him Mr. March Madness. Or Super Mario. Or The HEAT's unsung X-Factor. Whatever you call Mario Chalmers, make sure to show the man some serious respect. Because over the course of his basketball career, the fifth-year HEAT point guard has proven time and time again that he is, above all else, a winner. With a serious skill set that includes a lightning-quick pair of hands and seemingly anywhere-inside-the-arena shooting range. And a remarkable flair for coming up big in crucial, game-defining moments. With March Madness now burning up the sports airwaves, you're likely to see and hear unforgettable evidence of Chalmers' clutch character. And probably more than once or twice. In 2008, Chalmers was a junior at the University of Kansas when he authored what is now known as "Mario's Miracle" to help lead the Jayhawks to their fifth NCAA Championship. Chalmers' dramatic 3-ponter with 2.1 seconds left in regulation knotted the Championship Game against the Memphis Tigers at 63-63 and forced overtime. Kansas went on to win the game 75-68, and Chalmers was named Most Outstanding Player after scoring 18 points, grabbing 3 rebounds, dishing 3 assists and snaring a game-high 4 steals. Chalmers did what HEAT fans have now become accustomed to watching him do in that game. He drained a big-time, long-range shot. And he repeatedly disrupted the opposing team's offensive flow on the defensive end. The 6-foot-2, 190-pound Chalmers decided to declare for the 2008 NBA Draft after that virtuoso performance, which capped a season that saw him average 12.8 points, 3.1 rebounds, a team-high 2.5 steals and a team-high 4.3 assists. His 97 steals tied the school single-season record he had set the season before, and he also led the Jayhawks with a sensational 46.8% mark from behind the 3-point arc. The HEAT selected Chalmers in the second round, with the 34th overall pick of the draft, and he immediately became a key component for coach Erik Spoelstra, then in his first season at the HEAT's helm. Chalmers started all 82 regular season games at point guard as a rookie in 2008-09, averaging 10.0 points, 4.9 assists, 2.8 rebounds and a remarkable 1.95 steals. Proving his uncanny acumen for taking the ball away from opponents translated from college to the professional game, Chalmers' steals average led all rookies, and was the fourth-best among all NBA players. In fact, in just his fourth NBA game, Chalmers set a new HEAT record by racking up a remarkable 9 steals in a 106-83 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Nov. 5, 2008. Chalmers has continued to play a pivotal role for Spoelstra and the HEAT, averaging 8.4 points, 3.6 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 359 regular-season games in a HEAT uniform. He has also drilled 483 3-pointers at a 37.1% clip, including a HEAT-high 101 at a career-best 38.8% last season (he also shot a career-high 44.8% from the field overall) and a career-high 110 so far this season. Chalmers has also shown toughness and an ability to play through or bounce back quickly from injury, and has started every game he's appeared in at point guard over the past two seasons, becoming a staple of the HEAT's starting lineup alongside All-Stars LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. While he's not a traditional point guard by any means, he's not operating in anything like a traditional lineup these days. And his ability to both penetrate and stretch the floor on offense and disrupt flow and spark fastbreaks on defense are absolutely vital to the HEAT finding uncommon success via an unconventional approach. A truly versatile and deceptively athletic player, Chalmers also seems to exude a calm coolness that mirrors his home state of Alaska. The unflappable and ever-confident Chalmers even provided a cool off-court assist that many HEAT fans may not know about, giving his original number 6 to James when the reigning NBA and NBA Finals MVP announced he would be joining the HEAT on July 8, 2010. Chalmers returned to the 15 he wore while carving his name into the eternal annals of March Madness, and it has seemed to suit him very well. This March, Chalmers has played a vital role in the HEAT's own version of March Madness. As the HEAT have stretched their historic 27-games-and-counting winning streak through all but the first day of February and deep into the final days of March, Chalmers has frequently played at a high level, especially of late. In 15 games in March, all HEAT wins, Chalmers has averaged 10.3 points, 3.3 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.5 steals -- while shooting 46.0% from the field, including 43.7% from long-range. He's had a few positively huge games in March, and each was of extreme importance in the HEAT extending their franchise record-setting run of unbeaten games. Chalmers poured in 26 points and grabbed 7 rebounds -- both HEAT-highs -- and added 2 assists and 2 steals in a 105-91 win over the rival Indiana Pacers on March 10. The Sunday evening game was nationally televised, and Chalmers' offensive explosion helped blow up the physical Pacers' blueprint of overloading defensively on James and Wade. Chalmers canned 7 of 9 shots from the field, including 5 of 6 3-pointers, and was a perfect 7-for-7 from the free-throw line as the HEAT extended their streak to 18 straight wins. Eight days later, Chalmers scored 21 points to go with 3 rebounds, 2 assists, 2 steals and 1 block in a thrilling, come-from-behind 105-103 victory over the Celtics in Boston. Chalmers hit 6 of 10 field goals, including 4 of 5 from long-distance, and swished 5 of 6 free throws as the HEAT erased a 17-point first-half deficit and mounted a late comeback to stretch their streak to 23 consecutive wins -- and surpass the 2007-08 Houston Rockets' winning streak, which had previously ranked as the NBA's second-longest ever, behind the 1971-72 L.A. Lakers' 33-game unbeaten run. The next game out, Chalmers scored 17 points and added 2 assists as the HEAT pulled off an even more improbable comeback on the road, roaring back from down by as many as 27 points in the second half to post a 98-95 victory over the Cavaliers in Cleveland and push the win streak to 24 straight games. Chalmers was once again incredibly efficient, nailing 5 of 8 field goals, including 3 of 6 3-pointers, and 4 of 5 free throws. The following game, Chalmers scored 11 points, grabbed a game-high 4 steals, dished 3 assists and canned 3 of 6 3-pointers as the HEAT topped the Detroit Pistons 103-89 to extend the win streak to 25 games. Chalmers scored all 11 points in the first half, helping keep the HEAT in the thick of things before they really ramped up the defensive intensity during a dominant second half. Two games later, Chalmers helped James carry the scoring load while Wade rested a sore right knee, scoring 17 points, handing out 5 assists, snaring a game-high 3 steals and blocking 1 shot as the HEAT beat the Magic 108-94 in Orlando to run the streak to 27 games. Chalmers drained 4 of 5 3-pointers, including a perfect 3 of 3 in the first half -- which saw him score 13 points, dish 3 assists, grab 2 rebounds and 1 steal and block 1 shot as the HEAT built a 55-46 halftime lead on the road. He also finished a perfect 5 of 5 from the line in the game. Chalmers also had a brilliant, blistering and HEAT history-making game pre-streak. In a thrilling 128-99 win at Sacramento on Jan. 12, he scored a career-high 34 points and tied Brian Shaw's long-standing HEAT record by draining 10 3-pointers. Chalmers finished 12-of-16 from the field in his breakout scoring game, including 10-of-13 from long-range, in just 30 minutes of play. In fact, a closer look at Chalmers' offensive output reveals a telling tale for the HEAT as a whole. Put simply, when Chalmers scores in double figures, the HEAT are practically guaranteed a victory. Chalmers has scored 10 or more points 21 times this season, and the HEAT are 20-1 in those 21 games -- including 6-0 in such games in March and 11-0 during their remarkable winning streak. The HEAT also do quite well when Chalmers gets those exceptionally quick hands on a lot of loose balls. Chalmers has grabbed 3 or more steals 19 times this season, and the HEAT are 18-1 in those 19 games -- including 3-0 in such games in March and 6-0 during the streak. Of course, the HEAT haven't lost much at all this season, compiling an NBA-best 56-14 record and steadily building and maintaining that amazing streak for more than 50 calendar days now. Although James and Wade have received most of the praise and headlines for this historic HEAT season, Chalmers has also been an integral part of all that winning -- and not just in March. Chalmers has started and played in all 70 of those games, averaging 8.5 points, 3.4 assists, 2.2 rebounds and 1.6 steals, and has hit a career-high 110 3-pointers -- at a career-best 41.7% clip. He ranks fifth on the HEAT in scoring, third in assists and third in steals -- and third in both 3-pointers made and 3-point field goal percentage, just a few ticks off the blistering paces of veteran sharp-shooters Shane Battier and Ray Allen (the NBA's all-time leader in 3-pointers made, as well as HEAT's current leader with 122). And Chalmers has done all this while sharing a good amount of playing time with emerging second-year point guard Norris Cole, causing his minutes-per-game average to dip from last season's 28.5 to 26.6. Chalmers is also one of just a handful of NBA players (only 7 as of March 22) to have snared 100 steals and drained 100 3-pointers so far this season. Chalmers seems to be playing his best basketball as the HEAT gear up for what they hope is another deep, lucrative postseason run. And if history is any indication, HEAT fans can expect Chalmers to once again elevate his game when the second season kicks in. In 56 playoff games for the HEAT, Chalmers has averaged 9.4 points, 3.2 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 1.4 steals -- while hitting 78 3-pointers at a 35.9% rate. He's upped his scoring and rebounding averages under the white hot lights of the NBA playoffs, and averaged 11.3 points, 3.9 assists, 3.7 rebounds and 1.2 steals while nailing 33 3-pointers as the HEAT captured the franchise's second NBA Championship in the 2012 postseason. Chalmers exploded for 25 points, 6 rebounds and 5 assists in Game 3 of the HEAT's Eastern Conference Semifinals series against the Pacers, then helped the HEAT send the Pacers packing by pairing 11 rebounds with his 8 points and 3 assists in Game 5 and pumping in 15 points, including 3 3-pointers, in the closeout Game 6 win. Chalmers then had a huge 22-point, 6-assist, 4-rebound and 2-assist outing in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference Finals, helping the HEAT down the Boston Celtics in a 115-111 thriller. Chalmers scored 9 points or more in all 7 games of the grueling series, dished out at least 6 assists in 3 of the games and snared 8 total steal. But it was in the 2012 NBA Finals against the Oklahoma City Thunder where Chalmers came up biggest -- once again proving his love for the Big Moments. He poured in 25 points and added 3 assists, 2 rebounds and 2 steals in a 104-98 Game 4 win, scoring 12 points in the pivotal fourth quarter. And in the closeout Game 5, Chalmers had 10 points, 7 assists, 2 rebounds and 2 steals as the HEAT claimed the NBA Championship with a 121-106 victory. Chalmers has accomplished all this before his 27th birthday, which he likely won't have much time to celebrate on May 19 (the HEAT hope to be deep in the midst of another playoff run by then). And the truth is, Chalmers' pedigree as a winning basketball player runs even deeper than his college and professional careers. As a prep star in Anchorage, Alaska, Chalmers led Bartlett High School to consecutive state championships in 2002 and 2003 -- and a runner-up finish in 2004. He was also named 4A Alaska State Player of the Year three years in a row, joining former Duke University star Trajan Langdon as the only player to ever earn the honor three times. When you add up all the winning, clutch shooting and ballhawking defensive accomplishments of Chalmers over his basketball career, something becomes very clear: Mario Chalmers is a winner. And a vital ingredient in the HEAT's winning formula.
  6. Battier Coming Up Big For HEAT

    By Dylan Barmmer He's playing a new position. He's giving up 20, 30, 40, 50 pounds per game on the defensive end. He's in just his second season in the HEAT system. But Shane Battier is getting the job done. And then some. Battier has accomplished a lot throughout a professional basketball career that has spanned 12 seasons and three NBA teams, so it really should come as no surprise to HEAT fans that the veteran swingman is finding a way to contribute as the HEAT's 6-foot-8, 220-pound starting power forward -- many ways, to be exact. Through the HEAT's first 11 games of the 2012-13 season, Battier ranks fifth on the HEAT in scoring at 7.5 points per game and is tied with LeBron James for second with 1.0 blocks per game. Not deterred by spending time and energy banging big bodies in the low post, Battier also ranks fifth on the club in 3-point field goal percentage at 47.1% and first in 3-pointers made per game (2.2) through the HEAT's strong 8-3 start. A sharpshooter on a team stocked with snipers, Battier ranks 13th in the entire NBA in 3-point field goal percentage and is tied for eighth in 3-pointers made per game. He's drilled a team-high 24 3-pointers in a team-high 51 attempts, and has hit on a sizzling 15-of-24 attempts (62.5%) over the last four games -- all on the road. Not coincidentally, the HEAT won three of those four games, including the last two without the services of Dwyane Wade, who has been resting a sore foot. Battier picked up his offense dramatically in those two games, scoring a season-high 18 points in a 98-93 win at Denver on Nov. 15 and 12 in a 97-88 victory at Phoenix two nights later. Battier made 10 of 15 shots in those two wins, all coming from long-range. Talk about efficient. Battier's superior conditioning and seemingly endless energy make HEAT fans forget that he's a 34-year-old, 12-year NBA veteran, but the smarts, savvy and clutch play of the former Duke University star serve as ample reminders of his vast experience. There's so many things he does well, and many of those things don't show up in your standard box score. Of course, Battier's value has long transcended standard statistical summation, as evidenced by the New York Times Magazine piece once penned on him by sportswriter Michael Lewis entitled "The No-Stats All-Star." And this year has been no different -- even as Battier's positional assignment has changed, and he's transitioned from a reserve role into a starting spot. The win in Denver serves as an ideal example of Battier's multi-faceted and versatile game. Yes, there were the season-high 18 points on the game-high six hits from long range. But there were also the handful of charging calls he drew, most of them coming at key points in the game and helping to spark or extend pivotal HEAT runs. And there were the numerous other times he recklessly yet strategically launched his sinewy, flexible frame into the teeth of the opposing offense. At times it's almost like Battier is a skilled defensive back in a football game, locking down opponents and relentlessly hunting down the ball every time it's thrown into his airspace. And just like the defensive back often won't get talked about unless he's beaten deep or comes up with a big interception, you often won't hear much mention of Battier unless he hits the deck or drills a timely triple. But Battier's name has been called more and more by both HEAT coach Erik Spoelstra and game announcers lately. And it's increasingly clear that despite the tough positional assignment that has him battling younger behemoths like the Nuggets' Kenneth Faried and L.A. Clippers star Blake Griffin, Battier is clearly more comfortable in the HEAT system this season than he was last year, when he joined the team as a free-agent signing just before the start of a frantic, lockout-compressed 66-game season. Of course, Battier emerged as a valuable component of that NBA World Champion HEAT team, averaging 4.8 points, 2.4 rebounds, 1.0 steals and nailing 62 3-pointers in 23.1 minutes off the bench in 65 games. He did serve as a starter in 10 games, mostly filling in for Wade at shooting guard, but seeing some time at small forward as well. The former No. 6 overall pick in the 2001 NBA Draft was even more valuable during the HEAT's playoff run to their second NBA title, averaging 7.0 points, 3.3 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.0 steals in 33.4 minutes a game. His value, role and confidence continuing to grow as the season and postseason progressed, Battier ended up starting 16 of 23 postseason games, mostly at the small forward position, and nailing a HEAT-high 42 3-pointers during the title run. Battier was especially prolific during the HEAT's five-game NBA Finals win over Oklahoma City, scoring 9 or more points in four of the five games, including 17 in each of the first two and 11 in the closeout game. He canned a remarkable 15 of 26 shots from long-range (57.7%) and grabbed 4 or more rebounds three times. As usual, Battier's all-around game was strong in many other areas, and he helped limit the extremely explosive, young Thunder to under 100 points in three of the five games. Battier has continued to provide sweet shooting from long-range this season, while somehow managing to mix in spirited defense against men often much larger and longer than him down in the paint. It's been a win-win sort of situation, as the continued evolution of James' own post game, along with Chris Bosh's move to center, allows Battier to sneak and float back outside for good looks at 3-point shots fairly often on the offensive end, and he has continued to drain those shots when they matter most. So you might say Shane Battier is doing for the HEAT what he's always done during his decorated basketball career -- a little bit of everything.
  7. By Dylan Barmmer He stands a towering, sinewy 6-foot-10. He can step in and contribute at either forward position. He has the knowledge, toughness and vision that can only be gained from 14 years of NBA experience. He ranks eighth in NBA history -- and fifth among active players -- in made 3-point field goals (with 1,690 and counting). He has averaged over 16 points and 5 rebounds (16.1 and 5.6, to be exact) while playing for three teams in 934 NBA regular-season games. He has been an NBA All-Star twice, and played in the NBA Finals once (knocking LeBron James' Cleveland Cavaliers out of the 2009 Eastern Conference Finals as the star scorer for the Orlando Magic). And now, Rashard Lewis is ready for the next chapter of his highly decorated and compelling career -- as a member of the 2012 World Champion Miami HEAT. The HEAT didn't need to tweak too much following a blistering run to the franchise's second World Championship. After all, LeBron James won Regular Season and NBA Finals MVP honors while franchise face Dwyane Wade and versatile, valuable big man Chris Bosh helped stoke a red-hot run that culminated in a five-game triumph over the talented young Oklahoma City Thunder. Of course, life in today's NBA requires constant roster evolution, management and flexibility. So a few key pieces were added, with NBA all-time 3-point marksman Ray Allen and fellow silky smooth sharpshooter Lewis leading the way. Each veteran brings an array of proven skills, experience and insight to the already deep HEAT roster. But only Lewis possesses the rarest of rare blends of size and shooting ability. Not only is Lewis 6-foot-10, but he possesses a massive wingspan, and he's a career 45.4% shooter from the field, including 38.8% from long distance. It's not too many near-7-footers who can step back and knock down clutch 3-pointers. It's even fewer who can do so with enough accuracy, consistency and variety to rank among the Top 10 long-distance snipers in NBA history. But that's exactly what the 33-year-old Lewis has done during a remarkable career that saw him enter the NBA as a second-round draft pick of the Seattle SuperSonics (who later became the Thunder) straight out of Houston's Alief Elsik High School in 1998. Lewis went on to play nine seasons as a teammate of Allen's in Seattle, averaging over 20 points a game in each of the final three, including a career-high 22.4 in 2006-07. The following season, his first as a member of the Magic following a lucrative signing as a free agent, Lewis canned a career-best 226 3-pointers. A year later, Lewis led the NBA with 220 3-point field goal makes, and helped budding center (and new Los Angeles Laker) Dwight Howard lead Orlando to the 2009 NBA Finals, where they fell to the Lakers in five games. It was during that postseason run that Lewis helped the Magic knock off James' Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference Finals. Lewis went on to star for the Magic for parts of two more years before being traded to the Washington Wizards during the 2010-11 season. Lewis was limited by knee soreness during the lockout-shortened season that saw the HEAT roar to the title, playing in 28 games for Washington in 2012, including 15 starts. Lewis still managed to average 7.8 points, 3.9 rebounds and 1.0 assists in just 26.0 minutes per game. He ended up playing in 60 overall games as a Wizard, starting 42 of them. Now a proud member of the HEAT following his offseason signing, Lewis has patiently worked his way into the mix during the start of 2012-13 preseason play. Erik Spoelstra and his staff have gradually expanded Lewis' reserve role, and he turned in his finest performance yet in a 104-102 win over San Antonio on Oct. 20. Lewis scored a HEAT-high 15 points and added 4 steals and 3 rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench in the comeback win. He drained 6-of-9 field goal attempts, including 3-of-6 from three-point range, and scored 11 of his 15 points during a game-turning 27-point fourth quarter by the HEAT. In five games off the bench, Lewis has averaged 7.4 points, shooting 13-of-27 from the field, including 6-of-16 from long range. He's also averaged 2.2 rebounds in 19.6 minutes as he begins to find his rhythm and role while adjusting to a new team in a new city. Including two games in Beijing, China during a hectic preseason. Talk about long range... Lewis' range, ranginess, versatility, experience and team-first attitude certainly make for an attractive package, and Spoelstra and HEAT fans alike are excited to see what the veteran big man with the sweet stroke and unique skill set will bring to the HEAT as they gear up for what promises to be an electrifying title defense. As a new member of a tight-knit, successful and veteran team, Lewis' ideal role and rhythm will take a little time to crystalize, much as we witnessed with point guard Norris Cole during his fascinating rookie season last year. One thing is for sure -- it will be hard to miss Lewis when he takes the floor for the HEAT.