Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Danny

HEAT 101 - 76ers 86 Game Recap and Infographic

Recommended Posts

670-heat76erspost-140117.jpg

(Photo Credit: Jesse Garrabrant)

 

The Miami HEAT comfortably defeated the Philadelphia 76ers Friday night at the Wells Fargo Center. Miami jumped out to an early lead on Philadelphia and never allowed them to close the gap.

 

Impact Performance of the Night: Chris Bosh dominated the Philadelphia 76ers in his 33 minutes of action Friday night. Bosh finished with 25 points, six rebounds, five blocks, four assists and two steals. He was everywhere and the 76ers had no answer for him on either end of the floor. Bosh hit a few jumpers early to get started and maintained the touch throughout the game Reuniting with the previously injured Mario Chalmers, Bosh had a few really nice finishes in the pick-and-roll. The HEAT hit him with passes moving towards the basket, which led to easy points. Bosh also flashed his passing ability on a sweet give-and-go with Norris Cole and a lob to LeBron James for an alley-oop. Bosh protected the rim, his five blocks a season high. The HEAT’s defense was key to their victory tonight and Bosh’s presence was a big part of that.

 

The Deciding Run: Miami held a comfortable lead throughout the contest and that was thanks to a quick 11-2 spurt that spanned the final minutes of the first quarter and the beginning of the second quarter. Miami led the 76ers 29-22 after a Tony Wroten three-pointer. Norris Cole hit a pair of free throws then knocked down a three to get things going for Miami. Dwyane Wade, Ray Allen then Cole again each scored two points and the HEAT’s lead grew to 40-24. The 76ers never threatened the HEAT’s lead again.

 

Play of the Game: Chris Bosh’s passing was on display tonight, and his high-low pass to LeBron James in the fourth quarter was perfect. Bosh held the ball at the top of the key, behind the three-point line, looking to make a play. When his defender turned for a split second, LeBron James cut to the rim. Bosh delivered the perfect lob and James finished it with fury. Bosh’s passing from the top of the key is often pivotal for the HEAT in getting easy looks for James and Dwyane Wade in the post. Tonight, it was a simple cut from James that opened up an alley-oop opportunity

 

Efficiency Rating: Offensive Efficiency: 104.3; Defensive Efficiency: 82.5

 

Trend to Watch: The HEAT looked much better out of the gate, and some of that has to be due to the returns of Shane Battier on Wednesday and Mario Chalmers tonight. The HEAT’s starting five of Chalmers, Wade, James, Battier and Bosh hadn’t played together in since the Warriors game two weeks ago. That group fits very well together and has been the backbone of the HEAT’s last two Championship runs. Battier and Chalmers combined for 23 points, knocking down five three-pointers to space the floor. They also played strong defense, grabbing five steals and blocking a pair of shots. Having them back smoothes out the HEAT rotation, putting all the different layers into place. They improve the HEAT’s defense and free up Norris Cole to be the defensive bulldog on the second unit that gives opponents fits. There will be missed games from players again, but it was nice to see the starting five back on the floor together, beating an opponent with pace and space.

 

The Takeaway: This win should help wash away some of the three game losing the HEAT were stuck in. They came out early in the game and played well on both ends of the floor to open up a comfortable lead. The movement on offense was very encouraging. Dwyane Wade and LeBron James didn’t score much early on, but that’s because the attention they drew led to open shots for guys along the perimeter. Chris Bosh, Shane Battier and Mario Chalmers took care of business, knocking down their open looks. Defensively, the HEAT played very well for most of the night. They recorded 13 steals, their first double digit total in two weeks and set a season high in blocks with 12. These are usually indicators that the HEAT defense is clicking. With the main rotation back in place, the defensive rotations were much sharper. The 76ers couldn’t get anything to the rim in the early going and the HEAT were strongly contesting every jumper. This was just the kind of performance the HEAT needed to have.

 

Notes: LeBron James finished with 21 points, 10 assists and eight rebounds. Shane Battier and Norris Cole scored 13 points apiece. Chris Andersen and Toney Douglas were inactive.

 

Infographic: 

 

140117-infernofastbreak.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they lashed him again. the same person who's shooting 59% got pushed aside the flow of the offense. LeBron must be aware of the fact he was only given 13 shots and got to create more. when he receive the ball, know this bs is happening. change the offensive flow by him coaching the team instead of spo! before it's to late. i'm starting to take a kill on spo's mit bs. pssst!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to see MIAMI get back to winning. They can't relax yet, however, with a fiesty Bobcats team up next. MIAMI will need another monster game from BOSH in this one...TEAM HEAT since '88!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love it when Bosh's shot is falling and the team feeds him. He is so deadly when getting love.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that's nothing. bosh's shots comes and goes. time to take the real war. it's against the scam and injustice done by the league when they manufacture made up legacies to the delight of the casual throats in which it crams down to. i will never respect it and i hope that one day this ends and play the competition fair but we all know who's BIW and i don't want any excuses! the king demands 30 shots tonight!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great game from Bosh, huge stats and work  he put up there, the kind of passion we like to see from him and  the team on both ends,we played  a nice game last night….

 

Keep working up Heat……

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Joe B.

      Photo Credit: Issac Baldizon
      The Miami HEAT fell to the Philadelphia 76ers 106-102 Saturday afternoon in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference First Round. Dwyane Wade led the way for the HEAT with 25 points. Philadelphia now leads the series 3-1. Click here for the full recap on HEAT.com.
    • By Joe B.

      Photo Credit: Issac Baldizon
      The Miami HEAT host the Philadelphia 76ers Saturday afternoon at AmericanAirlines Arena in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference First Round. Philadelphia leads the series 2-1. Get your tickets now! Tip-off is set for 2:30 PM. Television coverage on FOX Sports Sun begins at 2:00 PM. You can also listen to the action live on 790 The Ticket.
      1: What happened in the fourth quarter of Game 3 that allowed the 76ers to suddenly pull away after a close game?
      Couper Moorhead: For three quarters it was a rough and tumble, gritty, chippy game that for some reason also featured a ton of scoring from both sides. And then, Miami stopped scoring for about two minutes and that was all it took for the 76ers to gain a double-digit lead. The HEAT climbed back to within a couple possessions but Philadelphia answered back with a mammoth run of their own to seal the game.
      The strange thing about the game was that Miami really was never playing badly. Even early in the fourth quarter, they had a few turnovers but they were still playing with physicality and force that was at least an approximation of how they want to consistently play. The HEAT simply made a few small mistakes, missed a few shots, and that was all it took with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons playing very well. That’s sort of the playoffs in a nutshell, especially against a high-level opponent. You can play a great game, you can make a ton of shots, but string just a few poor or even average possessions together and that can be all it takes for things to go against you. 
      Sure, the 76ers made a ton of threes and got to the free-throw line, but so did Miami. It wasn’t a game about those things in the end. It was a game about how well you have to play when the margin for error shrinks in the postseason. 
      Joe Beguiristain: After both teams essentially scored at will through three quarters, the 76ers ramped up their defense and made things difficult for the HEAT in the fourth. Thanks in large part to Philadelphia’s length and Joel Embiid’s presence at the rim, Miami scored just 14 points on 5-of-19 shooting in the period. Sure, Josh Richardson hit some big threes at the beginning of the quarter, but the 76ers responded very well.
      While the HEAT ultimately fell short, they matched Philadelphia's physicality and intensity for most of the night. In particular, Justise Winslow really impressed with 19 points on 4-of-6 shooting from deep and two remarkable blocks on Embiid and Robert Covington in the fourth. Ever since the playoffs began, Winslow’s whole demeanor has changed and he’s been locked in even more than he usually is. 
      The playoffs can certainly bring out the best in a player.
      2: Now that we’ve seen Joel Embiid in this series, how might the HEAT adjust to his presence?
      Couper: We noted going into that game that Embiid had been one of the most impactful players in the league this season and, despite some rust after a long injury layoff in the fist half, he was every bit that impactful player in Game 3. He stretched the floor, he stabilized Philadelphia’s offense with scoring and playmaking out of the post and, most importantly, his defense was at an All-World level.
      Defensively the HEAT have no choice but to rise to the challenge of making Embiid’s catches tough, contesting his jumpers and, perhaps most importantly given the physical nature of this series, not putting him on the foul line. It’s much more difficult to defend the 76ers when you can play 18 seconds of great, forceful defense and they can just throw the ball to Embiid to create a decent look. 
      It’s on the other end of the floor where Miami might have to get particularly creative. With Embiid on the court, the HEAT shot just 1-of-8 at the rim, a number concerning both for the percentage and the volume. On so many pick-and-rolls and handoffs, Embiid would just sit back about 10-12 feet from the ball and wait to be challenged in the paint where his size makes shots exceedingly difficult. Miami combated this for a time pulling up and hitting mid-range shots, which helped them keep pace with the aforementioned three and free-throws they were earning, but eventually the number of jumpers began to take its toll. As for how they can best get to the rim against Embiid, it might come down to the old Roy Hibbert playbook. Make sure Embiid has to defend on the move so he isn’t able to stand waiting in the paint, make him guard out on the perimeter whenever possible and, on the other end, get stops so Miami can run out in transition.
      Joe: Let’s get this out of the way first: neutralizing a dominant force like Embiid is no easy task. With his combination of height, length and mobility, he’s pretty much a nightmare to deal with on both ends of the floor. All that said, Miami never backs down from a challenge, especially in the postseason.
      On the offensive end, the HEAT would be wise to either attack the basket and spray it out to open shooters on the perimeter or get Embiid involved in the pick-and-roll so he gets a little further away from the basket. Luckily enough, both Goran Dragić and Dwyane Wade are deadly when attacking downhill, so perhaps they can find some openings for themselves and their teammates in that scenario.
      Defensively, Miami has to try and force Embiid to catch the ball out of his comfort zones around the block. While making the 24-year-old get the ball further out doesn’t guarantee anything since he can still knock down mid-range jumpers and in-rhythm treys, it at least gives the HEAT a better chance at stopping him. 
      3: The HEAT have, by the percentages, defended Philadelphia’s threes well in Game 2 and poorly in Games 1 and 3. Are you seeing any trends in that area of the game?
      Couper: The 76ers were never going to shoot as well as they did in Game 1, hitting over 60 percent from deep, nor were they going to miss as many as in Game 2, shooting less than 20 percent. But then they came out and hit 18-of-34 again, many of them shots much better contested than the ones Miami gave up in Game 1 when Brett Brown went to his super-stretchy lineups. Some shots, like Marco Bellineli puling up from 30 feet on the move or Embiid shooting a contested look on the wing, you can only do so much about, but there are always things you can do better before leaving things up to chance. That means making Philadelphia miss more moments with deflections and by breaking up those fluid off-ball actions. You might not always make them miss, but you can make them just a little bit more uncomfortable and, in a best case scenario, make them not shoot the three in the first place.
      Joe: It’s no secret that Philadelphia is one of the best passing and screening teams in the league, which often causes the opposition to scramble a bit more than it would like. And outside of Game 2, the 76ers have shown just that thus far in this series.
      To combat a well-oiled machine like Philadelphia, the HEAT have to find a balance between being ultra aggressive in one-on-one defense and knowing the correct defensive rotation once the 76ers get into their second and third actions.
      Guys like Winslow, James Johnson and Josh Richardson have really answered the call defensively, but the trio has to somehow find another level on Saturday afternoon.
       
      Highlights:
      Game 3 – 76ers at HEAT
      Game 2 – HEAT at 76ers
      Game Notes:
      Goran Dragić leads the HEAT in points (19.3) and assists (5.0) per game during the postseason. Ben Simmons leads the 76ers in rebounds (10.0), assists (9.7) and steals (2.0) per contest during the playoffs. After this game, the series will shift back to Philadelphia for Game 5.